Wallace Blog



Dancers and Musicians Get Audiences Moving at CRASHfest in Boston9254<p> <a href="http&#58;//worldmusic.org/">World Music/CRASHarts</a>, one of the organizations participating in Wallace’s <a href="/knowledge-center/building-audiences-for-the-arts/Pages/default.aspx">Building Audiences for Sustainability initiative</a>, held its third annual CRASHfest on Saturday, February 24. CRASHfest is a celebration of music, dance, food and culture from around the world. It is also World Music/CRASHarts’s flagship event to help attract younger audiences to the <a href="http&#58;//worldmusic.org/events/list-events">extensive series</a> of performances it presents every year.</p><p>A detailed account of CRASHfest and its role in the organization’s audience-development efforts is due this fall. But that’s too long to wait to post some of the photos we took at the event&#58;<br></p><p style="text-align&#58;center;">​<img class="wf-Image-Left" alt="IMG_8545-CRASHfest.jpg" src="/News-and-Media/Blog/PublishingImages/Pages/Dancers-and-musicians-get-audiences-moving-at-CRASHfest-in-Boston/IMG_8545-CRASHfest.jpg" style="margin&#58;5px;width&#58;779px;" /> </p><p class="wf-Element-ImageCaption" style="text-align&#58;left;">New York City's first all-female mariachi band, Flor de Toloache, kick off the festivities on the CRASHfest main stage.<br></p><p class="wf-Element-ImageCaption" style="text-align&#58;center;"> <br> </p><div style="text-align&#58;center;"> <img class="wf-Image-Left" alt="IMG_8628-CRASHfest.jpg" src="/News-and-Media/Blog/PublishingImages/Pages/Dancers-and-musicians-get-audiences-moving-at-CRASHfest-in-Boston/IMG_8628-CRASHfest.jpg" style="margin&#58;5px;color&#58;#666666;font-family&#58;freightsans_promedium_italic;font-size&#58;14px;" /> </div><p class="wf-Element-ImageCaption" style="text-align&#58;left;">Subject&#58;Matter, a local tap dance company, wow the crowd on a bump-out stage in the main hall. The bump-out stage,<br> new to CRASHfest in 2018, kept crowds entertained as bands set up on the main stage.<br></p><p class="wf-Element-ImageCaption" style="text-align&#58;left;"><br></p> <p>&#160;</p><p class="wf-Element-ImageCaption" style="text-align&#58;center;"> <img class="wf-Image-Left" alt="IMG_8706-CRASHfest.jpg" src="/News-and-Media/Blog/PublishingImages/Pages/Dancers-and-musicians-get-audiences-moving-at-CRASHfest-in-Boston/IMG_8706-CRASHfest.jpg" style="margin&#58;5px;" /> </p><p class="wf-Element-ImageCaption" style="text-align&#58;left;">Maure Aronson, founder and executive director of World Music/CRASHarts, introduces Malian singer and guitarist,&#160;<br>Vieux Farka Touré</p><p class="wf-Element-ImageCaption">&#160;</p><p class="wf-Element-ImageCaption" style="text-align&#58;center;">&#160;</p><p class="wf-Element-ImageCaption" style="text-align&#58;left;"> <img class="wf-Image-Left" alt="IMG_8785-CRASHfest.jpg" src="/News-and-Media/Blog/PublishingImages/Pages/Dancers-and-musicians-get-audiences-moving-at-CRASHfest-in-Boston/IMG_8785-CRASHfest.jpg" style="margin&#58;5px;" />Malian singer and guitarist Vieux Farka Touré, who appeared to be one of the stronger draws to the main stage.</p><p>&#160;</p><p class="wf-Element-ImageCaption" style="text-align&#58;center;"> <img class="wf-Image-Left" alt="IMG_8706-CRASHfest.jpg" src="/News-and-Media/Blog/PublishingImages/Pages/Dancers-and-musicians-get-audiences-moving-at-CRASHfest-in-Boston/IMG_8835-CRASHfest.jpg" style="margin&#58;5px;" /> </p><p class="wf-Element-ImageCaption" style="text-align&#58;left;">Brazilian dance ensemble SambaAiva teaches the crowd how to &quot;party like a Brazilian.&quot;</p><p>&#160;</p><p class="wf-Element-ImageCaption" style="text-align&#58;center;"> <img class="wf-Image-Left" alt="IMG_8926-CRASHfest.jpg" src="/News-and-Media/Blog/PublishingImages/Pages/Dancers-and-musicians-get-audiences-moving-at-CRASHfest-in-Boston/IMG_8926-CRASHfest.jpg" style="margin&#58;5px;" /> <br> </p><p class="wf-Element-ImageCaption" style="text-align&#58;left;">Zimbabwean sextet Mokoomba's synchronized dance moves appeared particularly popular with the audience</p><p class="wf-Element-ImageCaption">&#160;<br></p><p class="wf-Element-ImageCaption" style="text-align&#58;center;"> <img class="wf-Image-Left" alt="IMG_8969-CRASHfest.jpg" src="/News-and-Media/Blog/PublishingImages/Pages/Dancers-and-musicians-get-audiences-moving-at-CRASHfest-in-Boston/IMG_8969-CRASHfest.jpg" style="margin&#58;5px;" /> <br> </p><p class="wf-Element-ImageCaption" style="text-align&#58;left;">The audience gets younger (and on the whole drunker) as the evening wears on and&#160;<br>Zimbabwean Afropop sextet Mokoomba takes stage.<br><br></p><p class="wf-Element-ImageCaption">&#160;<img class="wf-Image-Left" alt="IMG_8990-CRASHfest.jpg" src="/News-and-Media/Blog/PublishingImages/Pages/Dancers-and-musicians-get-audiences-moving-at-CRASHfest-in-Boston/IMG_8990-CRASHfest.jpg" style="margin&#58;5px;" /><br></p><p class="wf-Element-ImageCaption" style="text-align&#58;center;"> <br> </p><p class="wf-Element-ImageCaption" style="text-align&#58;left;">Two music fans look for a spot to add their photo-booth picture to the Boston skyline.&#160;<br>One in the background poses alongside hers.</p><p class="wf-Element-ImageCaption">&#160;</p><p class="wf-Element-ImageCaption">&#160;</p> <br> <br> <br>A rich tapestry of global culture at World Music/CRASHarts’s third annual festival of international performing arts.GP0|#3684430d-1156-47e2-905a-086b771432fd;L0|#03684430d-1156-47e2-905a-086b771432fd|Building audiences for the arts;GTSet|#e1be52fb-ad26-4379-9818-fd44f616dcf2;GP0|#f8b72a19-801c-4c88-a951-46e5c8f4b419;L0|#0f8b72a19-801c-4c88-a951-46e5c8f4b419|Strategies for Expanding Arts AudiencesGP0|#8056f3bc-89c1-4297-814a-3e71542163be;L0|#08056f3bc-89c1-4297-814a-3e71542163be|Building Audiences for the Arts;GTSet|#a1e8653d-64cb-48e0-8015-b5826f8c5b61Wallace editorial team79<img alt="" src="/knowledge-center/PublishingImages/blog-crashfest-lg-feature.jpg" style="BORDER&#58;0px solid;" />2018-03-16T04:00:00ZYour source for research and ideas to expand high quality learning and enrichment opportunities. Supporting: School Leadership, After School, Summer and Extended Learning Time, Arts Education and Building Audiences for the Arts.3/16/2018 3:21:44 PM96http://www.wallacefoundation.org/News-and-Media/Blog/Pages/Forms/AllItems.aspxhtmlFalseaspx
NY Times’ David Brooks Gives a Nod to School Principals9248<p>I n a recent <em>New York Times</em> piece, columnist David Brooks highlights a key to school improvement— “a special emphasis on principals.” </p><p>His piece carries the headline <a href="https&#58;//www.nytimes.com/2018/03/12/opinion/good-leaders-schools.html">Good Leaders Make Good Schools</a>, and, boy, did it ever resonate with us here at Wallace. School leadership is a field we’ve plowed for close to two decades, through numerous initiatives and related research. Some of that work found its way into Brooks’ column. He cites, among other sources, a major Wallace-commissioned research report, <a href="/knowledge-center/pages/investigating-the-links-to-improved-student-learning.aspx"><em>Learning From Leadership</em></a>, whose authors write that “we have not found a single case of a school improving its student achievement record in the absence of talented leadership.” </p><p>Brooks puts a human face on research when he takes note of a <a href="/knowledge-center/pages/the-school-principal-as-leader-guiding-schools-to-better-teaching-and-learning.aspx">Wallace account</a> (look for p. 12) of the efforts by Kentucky educator Dewey Hensley to turn around a low-performing Louisville elementary school in the mid-2000s. “In his first week,” Brooks writes of Hensley, “he drew a picture of a school on a poster board and asked the faculty members to annotate it together. ‘Let’s create a vision of a school that’s perfect. When we get there we’ll rest.’”&#160; </p><p>To be capable of improving schools, Brooks says, the job of principal has to change from a focus on administrative tasks such as budgeting and scheduling. Effective principals today, he says, are busy “greeting parents and students outside the front door in the morning” and then “constantly circulating through the building, offering feedback, setting standards, applying social glue.” </p><p>You can find out the details of this changing role and what it takes to bring it about by checking out the <a href="/knowledge-center/school-leadership/pages/default.aspx">school leadership section</a> of our website. Search through our 100+ reports, videos, and other resources, including—newly!—<a href="/knowledge-center/pages/podcast-principal-pipeline.aspx">a podcast series on principal pipelines</a>. </p><p>And here’s a note for the research-minded. <a href="/knowledge-center/pages/investigating-the-links-to-improved-student-learning.aspx"><em>Learning From Leadership</em></a> is an extensive follow-up to the landmark Wallace-supported study, <a href="/knowledge-center/pages/how-leadership-influences-student-learning.aspx"><em>How Leadership Influences Student Learning</em></a><em>.</em> Published in 2004, this literature review found that leadership is second only to teaching among school-related influences on student success. It’s our most downloaded report. </p> <br>In new column, the syndicated columnist explores role of principals in improving schools GP0|#3fabc3e0-eead-49a5-9e92-99d8217d8607;L0|#03fabc3e0-eead-49a5-9e92-99d8217d8607|principals;GTSet|#e1be52fb-ad26-4379-9818-fd44f616dcf2;GP0|#3c236eec-afa6-4172-9b42-36a57befc9fe;L0|#03c236eec-afa6-4172-9b42-36a57befc9fe|principal pipeline;GP0|#0749b622-d2bc-4ff6-bf7d-ee28a6072887;L0|#00749b622-d2bc-4ff6-bf7d-ee28a6072887|district policy;GP0|#272c324e-45c1-44de-ae99-0b46e388f96a;L0|#0272c324e-45c1-44de-ae99-0b46e388f96a|New York TimesGP0|#330c9173-9d0f-423a-b58d-f88b8fb02708;L0|#0330c9173-9d0f-423a-b58d-f88b8fb02708|School Leadership;GTSet|#a1e8653d-64cb-48e0-8015-b5826f8c5b61Wallace editorial team79<img alt="" src="/knowledge-center/PublishingImages/brooks-op-ed-lg-feature.jpg" style="BORDER&#58;0px solid;" />2018-03-13T04:00:00ZNY Times’ David Brooks Gives a Nod to School Principals3/14/2018 2:54:17 PM81http://www.wallacefoundation.org/News-and-Media/Blog/Pages/Forms/AllItems.aspxhtmlFalseaspx
How to Get Kids and Parents Psyched for Summer Learning9210 <p>The National Summer Learning Project—a collaboration between The Wallace Foundation, the RAND Corporation and five urban school districts—has produced <a href="/knowledge-center/Pages/Learning-from-Summer-Effects-of-Voluntary-Summer-Learning-Programs-on-Low-Income-Urban-Youth.aspx">promising evidence</a> that voluntary-attendance summer learning programs can help students succeed in school. But “voluntary” means that districts have to entice families to enroll. </p><p>As part of the project, we engaged Crosby Marketing Communications to help the districts participating do just that.</p><p><span aria-hidden="true"></span><img class="wf-Image-Left" alt="JRosenberg_V3_2X2_5.jpg" src="/News-and-Media/Blog/PublishingImages/Pages/How-to-Get-Kids-and-Parents-Psyched-for-Summer-Learning/JRosenberg_V3_2X2_5.jpg" style="margin&#58;5px;width&#58;374px;" />Crosby conducted focus groups of parents in three cities and found that, while they are motivated by the idea of preparing their children for the next grade, they also believe summer should be a break from the rigors of the school year. The term “summer learning” was not a familiar one, and “summer school” elicited a negative reaction because it evoked a remedial program. Crosby, a firm with expertise in what is known as “social marketing,” worked with the districts to develop social marketing campaigns that would overcome these obstacles. All five exceeded their recruitment goals.</p><p><a href="/knowledge-center/summer-learning/recruitment/pages/default.aspx">A new guide, developed by Crosby, and companion website,</a> presents lessons learned from that successful collaboration and advice to districts interested in launching or improving their own recruitment efforts. We talked to Jeff Rosenberg, an executive vice president at Crosby, about the guide and what he’s learned about encouraging students to attend summer learning programs.*</p><p><strong>Why is it so important for school districts to do a recruitment campaign for their summer learning programs?</strong></p><p>There are two main reasons. The first is, of course, to motivate parents and students to register. The second is that districts want to engage with the students who can benefit the most. To do that, you have to be intentional in who you reach out to and how you communicate.</p><p><strong>What is social marketing? How can school districts use it to recruit for their summer learning programs?</strong></p><p>Social marketing refers to using the principles and practices of marketing for the common good, that is, to raise awareness of a social issue or promote positive behavior change. At Crosby we have a lot of experience in social marketing. For example, we developed the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ national campaign encouraging people to sign up as organ donors. </p><p>By definition, a recruitment campaign for a summer learning program is social marketing. In the case of the National Summer Learning Project, we helped the districts practice what’s known as “community-based” social marketing—using the existing levers in a community to generate behavior change. That involved, for example, relying on the people in the community who are most trusted by parents and students—principals, teachers, and guidance counselors—to deliver the message and promote enrollment.</p><p><strong>What were the most essential/effective techniques that the districts you worked with used to recruit students?</strong></p><p>What the districts found most important was being consistent and assertive in their outreach. One mailing home was not enough to make a connection. The second thing was using several types of outreach. Sending a flyer home by “backpack express” can work, but as all parents know, those flyers don’t always make it to them, so you don’t want to rely on that one approach. The districts also found phone calls to parents to be effective, as well as recruitment events. Third, engaging directly with students is extremely valuable, whether it’s in the form of an event like a pizza party, a piece of mail addressed specifically to them, or a conversation with a teacher. </p><p><strong>Were there any activities that did not prove to be worth the effort or expense?</strong></p><p>A couple of districts conducted home visits, and while they certainly yielded some registrations, they may not justify the intense effort they require. Some districts tried raffles. Parents who sent in a registration form were automatically entered to win a prize. These can work, but we suspect that some parents who registered their children didn’t actually intend to send them to the program; they just wanted a chance at the prize.</p><p><strong>How can districts use the new </strong><a href="/knowledge-center/summer-learning/recruitment/pages/default.aspx">Summer Learning Recruitment website</a><strong> to develop a summer learning marketing campaign?</strong><br> <br> The website is designed so that someone can come in and develop an entire recruitment plan from A to Z. But it can also be a resource for a district that’s already actively recruiting and is just looking for some tips and tools to up its game. There’s guidance on how to develop a written plan. There are also a number of templates from a registration flyer to robocall scripts to talking points that teachers and principals can use when they reach out to parents and students. </p><p><strong>Do you have any final advice for school districts?</strong></p><p>When parents register their children for your summer learning program, view that as the beginning of a relationship. Follow up with a confirmation letter. Consider a “get ready for summer” event in the spring. Schedule robocalls to remind parents and students when your program starts. You’ll find templates in the guide. It’s crucial to use the time between the end of your registration period and the beginning of your summer learning program to get parents and students excited about what’s to come. That will help boost day one attendance.</p><p><em>*This interview has been edited and condensed.</em></p> Creator of new online guide offers up advice on recruiting for voluntary summer programs GP0|#cad33471-a186-455a-836f-0d0657808f00;L0|#0cad33471-a186-455a-836f-0d0657808f00|research;GTSet|#e1be52fb-ad26-4379-9818-fd44f616dcf2;GP0|#88b77bae-56d6-47d9-922f-54af703d57b5;L0|#088b77bae-56d6-47d9-922f-54af703d57b5|learning;GP0|#91bf67c6-3cc1-4097-9074-16701a50b2ac;L0|#091bf67c6-3cc1-4097-9074-16701a50b2ac|enrichment;GP0|#507166ce-121b-4ec6-97dc-339d45606921;L0|#0507166ce-121b-4ec6-97dc-339d45606921|summer;GP0|#79143c59-8d98-479b-aa51-eef565213797;L0|#079143c59-8d98-479b-aa51-eef565213797|toolsGP0|#ff9563e3-b973-45a7-8ac3-c9f4122f9a13;L0|#0ff9563e3-b973-45a7-8ac3-c9f4122f9a13|Summer Learning;GTSet|#a1e8653d-64cb-48e0-8015-b5826f8c5b61Wallace editorial team79<img alt="" src="/knowledge-center/PublishingImages/blog-jrosenberg-QA-lg-feature.jpg" style="BORDER&#58;0px solid;" />2018-03-06T05:00:00ZCreator of new online guide offers up advice on recruiting for voluntary summer programs3/6/2018 5:20:01 PM190http://www.wallacefoundation.org/News-and-Media/Blog/Pages/Forms/AllItems.aspxhtmlFalseaspx
‘Logic Models’ Prompt Hard Thinking About How to Achieve Results in Education9163<p>If you were planning a trip to a far-flung spot, you’d likely map the route, figuring out how to get from Starting Point A to Destination Point D and identifying what combination of planes, trains, and automobiles would take you through Points B and C. </p><p>Obvious, right? </p><p>Well, maybe for vacation travelers. But not always, it seems, for voyagers of a different sort&#58; organizations that embark on an effort to solve a thorny civic or social problem in the hope that this can lead to good outcomes for those affected. Too often, the would-be problem-solvers fail to clearly define the issue that concerns them—their departure Point A, you might say—and then plot out the path that will take them to intermediate progress—Points B and C—and, finally, a solution and the benefits it reaps, Point D. &#160;</p><p>That’s where a “logic model” comes in. No, the term refers neither to a brainiac runway star nor a paragon of rationality. Rather, a logic model is a kind-of map, says Wallace’s director of research and evaluation Ed Pauly, showing “why, logically, you’d expect to get the result you are aiming for.”</p><p>Logic models are on the minds of people at Wallace these days because of a <a href="/knowledge-center/pages/logic-models-evidence-based-school-leadership-interventions.aspx">RAND Corp. guide</a> we published recently to assist states and school districts planning for funding under the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), a major source of federal support for public education. The guide focuses on initiatives to expand the supply of effective principals, especially for high-needs schools. It describes how logic models can show the guardians of ESSA dollars that six types of school leadership “interventions” have a solid rationale, even though they are not yet backed by rigorous research. </p><p>Take, for example, one of the six interventions&#58; better&#160; practices for hiring school principals. The logic model begins with a problem—high-needs schools find it difficult to attract and retain high-quality principals—and ends with the hoped-for outcome of solving this problem&#58; “improved principal competencies→ improved schools→ improved student achievement,” as RAND puts it. In between are the activities thought to lead to the end, such as the introduction of new techniques for recruiting and hiring effective principals, as well as the short-term results they logically point to, such as the development of a larger pool of high-quality school leader candidates.</p><p>Helpful as they may be for persuading the feds to fund a worthy idea, logic models may have an even more important purpose&#58; testing the assumptions behind a large and expensive undertaking before it gets under way. The roots of this notion, Pauly says, go back to 1990s and the community of researchers tasked with evaluating the effects of large, complex human services programs.&#160; </p><p>As Pauly explains it, researchers were feeling frustration on two fronts—that programs they’d investigated as whole appeared to have had little impact <em>and</em> that the reasons for the lackluster showing were elusive. “It was a big puzzle,” Pauly says. “People were trying innovations, and they were puzzled by not being able to understand where they worked and where they didn’t.”</p><p>Into this fray, he says, entered Carol Hirschon Weiss, a Harvard expert in the evaluation of social programs. In an influential 1995 <a href="https&#58;//www.scribd.com/document/150652416/Nothing-as-Practical-as-a-Good-Theory-Exploring-Theory-Based-Evaluation-for-Comprehensive-Community-Initiatives-for-Children-and-Families">essay</a>, Weiss asserted that any social program is based on “theories of change,” implied or stated ideas about how an effort will work and why. Given that, she urged evaluators to shift from a strict focus on measuring a program’s outcomes to identifying the program operators’ basic ideas and their consequences as the program unfolded.&#160; </p><p>“The aim is to examine the extent to which program theories hold,” she wrote. “The evaluation should show which of the assumptions underlying the program break down, where they break down, and which of the several theories underlying the program are best supported by the evidence.”&#160; She also urged researchers to look at the series of “micro-steps” that compose program implementation and examine the assumptions behind these, too.</p><p>Weiss identified a number of reasons that evaluators might want to adopt this approach; among other things, confirming or disproving social program theories could foster better public policy, she said. But Weiss also made strikingly persuasive arguments about why partners in a complex social-change endeavor would want to think long and hard together before a program launch—including that reflection could unearth differences in views about a program’s purpose and rationale. That, in turn, could lead to the forging of a new consensus among program partners, to say nothing of refined practices and “greater focus and concentration of program energies,” she wrote.</p><p>There could be a lesson in this for the complex array of people involved in efforts to create a larger corps of effective principals—school district administrators, university preparation program leaders and principals themselves, to name just few. They may give themselves a better chance of achieving beneficial change if they first achieve a common understanding of what they seek to accomplish. &#160;&#160;&#160;</p><p>In other words, it helps when everyone on the journey is using the same map. </p><p> <img class="wf-Image-Left" alt="ED_5991-160px.jpg" src="/News-and-Media/Blog/PublishingImages/Pages/Logic-Models-Prompt-Hard-Thinking-About-How-to-Achieve-Results-in-Education-/ED_5991-160px.jpg" style="margin&#58;5px;" />&#160;</p><p>&#160;</p><p>&#160;</p><p>&#160;</p><p>​</p><table width="100%" class="wf-Table-default" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr></tr></tbody></table> <p>Ed Pauly,&#160; director of <br>research and evaluation,<br> The Wallace Foundation&#160;</p><table width="100%" class="wf-Table-default" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td class="wf-Table-default" style="width&#58;100%;">​</td></tr></tbody></table><p>*The title of Weiss’s essay is <em>Nothing as Practical as a Good Theory&#58; Exploring Theory-Based Evaluation for Comprehensive Community Initiatives for Children and Families</em>.</p>Charting the Path to Social Change Before You Head Down the TrailGP0|#3fabc3e0-eead-49a5-9e92-99d8217d8607;L0|#03fabc3e0-eead-49a5-9e92-99d8217d8607|principals;GTSet|#e1be52fb-ad26-4379-9818-fd44f616dcf2;GP0|#bbde7c6c-fad2-4884-a39f-0255c4606974;L0|#0bbde7c6c-fad2-4884-a39f-0255c4606974|state education policyGP0|#330c9173-9d0f-423a-b58d-f88b8fb02708;L0|#0330c9173-9d0f-423a-b58d-f88b8fb02708|School Leadership;GTSet|#a1e8653d-64cb-48e0-8015-b5826f8c5b61Pamela Mendels46<img alt="" src="/News-and-Media/Blog/PublishingImages/blog-logic-models-lg-feature.jpg" style="BORDER&#58;0px solid;" />2018-01-30T05:00:00Z‘Logic Models’ Prompt Hard Thinking About How to Achieve Results in Education1/30/2018 8:26:41 PM183http://www.wallacefoundation.org/News-and-Media/Blog/Pages/Forms/AllItems.aspxhtmlFalseaspx
Helping Afterschool Systems Find a Home9125 <p>Afterschool providers, schools, government agencies, private funders…they all want to give young people opportunities for growth, learning and fun. But they all have different roles and ways of working, so knitting their efforts together into coordinated systems is no easy task. Cities that set out to build, manage and sustain afterschool systems can use a little guidance along the way.</p><p><img class="wf-Image-Left" alt="sharon_deich1.jpg" src="/News-and-Media/Blog/PublishingImages/Pages/Helping-Afterschool-Systems-Find-a-Home/sharon_deich1.jpg" style="margin&#58;5px;width&#58;319px;" />That’s where the consulting firm FourPoint Education Partners, formerly Cross &amp; Joftus, comes in. From 2012 to 2017, FourPoint provided technical assistance (TA) to the nine cities participating in Wallace’s “next-generation” afterschool system-building initiative, helping them solidify systems that were already in place. (An earlier Wallace initiative had supported five cities starting systems from scratch.) FourPoint drew on that work for a new paper, <em><a href="/knowledge-center/Pages/Governance-Structures-for-City-Afterschool-Systems-Three-Models.aspx">Governance Structures for City Afterschool Systems&#58; Three Models</a></em>, describing three different models for setting up and running an afterschool system.</p><p>We caught up with Sharon Deich, a FourPoint partner, to discuss her role in the initiative and get her perspective on the past, present and future of afterschool system building. </p><p><strong>Describe the work you did as a TA provider for the initiative. </strong></p><p>First, we helped the cities think about how they were going to support their infrastructure when their Wallace money went away. Hand in hand with the finance work was the governance work. How do you create anchor points in the community for the work to deepen and grow, even if one of your key champions—like a mayor, a superintendent or a project lead—were to leave? The third piece was partnerships. Who else do you need to have at the table and then how do you plug them into your governance structure? The last piece was strategy. We worked closely with Wallace, thinking about where the initiative was going and what the needs and opportunities were.</p><p><strong>What is the most important thing you learned over the course of the initiative?</strong></p><p>We came in with the notion that you build a system and then, “Here it is.” But the [actual systems] were very dynamic. More than half the cities changed the home of their system or the organizational structure. In Denver, they started out with an initiative in the mayor’s office and ended up with a networked approach where the mayor’s office, the Boys &amp; Girls Club and the school district were jointly managing the work.</p><p><strong><img class="wf-Image-Right" alt="Governance_v1.jpg" src="/News-and-Media/Blog/PublishingImages/Pages/Helping-Afterschool-Systems-Find-a-Home/Governance_v1.jpg" style="margin&#58;5px;" />How do cities go about finding the right governance structure for their system?</strong></p><p>One consideration is, what’s the primary work of the system? Some systems focus on [program] quality, some on data, some on creating partnerships. They all touch that elephant in different places. If you’re building [new] programs, you might need a different home than if you’re trying to boost the quality of the work. Another factor is, who are your champions? If your mayor is a big champion it may be more logical to be in the mayor’s office or one of the city agencies. </p><p><strong>What do you still not know about system building that you still hope to learn?</strong></p><p>One of the hardest things about system building is communicating what you mean by “system building.” When I work in mainstream education, I often say, “It’s not about what one school is doing. It’s about how the district is supporting all the schools.” I don’t think there’s an equivalent in this mushy space where afterschool lives. Then how do you convince people that investment in system pieces is as important as dollars for programming? </p><p><strong>What does the future of afterschool system building look like to you? </strong></p><p>In this current environment, I can’t see afterschool growing and getting a lot of attention. I worry about the money for 21st Century [Community Learning Centers, a source of federal funding for afterschool]. So, it’s really important that afterschool be part of a broader package of supports and services that school districts and communities want for their kids. Whether it’s social and emotional learning, enrichment, homework help, meals—afterschool can be a delivery vehicle.</p> Talking Technical Assistance with Sharon Deich of FourPoint Education PartnersGP0|#4838d563-77b4-44ff-a5c1-d01628309a7e;L0|#04838d563-77b4-44ff-a5c1-d01628309a7e|afterschool systems;GTSet|#e1be52fb-ad26-4379-9818-fd44f616dcf2;GP0|#cad33471-a186-455a-836f-0d0657808f00;L0|#0cad33471-a186-455a-836f-0d0657808f00|research;GP0|#88b77bae-56d6-47d9-922f-54af703d57b5;L0|#088b77bae-56d6-47d9-922f-54af703d57b5|learning;GP0|#91bf67c6-3cc1-4097-9074-16701a50b2ac;L0|#091bf67c6-3cc1-4097-9074-16701a50b2ac|enrichmentGP0|#b804f37e-c5dd-4433-a644-37b51bb2e211;L0|#0b804f37e-c5dd-4433-a644-37b51bb2e211|Afterschool;GTSet|#a1e8653d-64cb-48e0-8015-b5826f8c5b61;GP0|#890cbc1f-f78a-45e7-9bf2-a5986c564667;L0|#0890cbc1f-f78a-45e7-9bf2-a5986c564667|Social and Emotional LearningWallace editorial team79<img alt="" src="/News-and-Media/Blog/PublishingImages/blog-sharon-deich-QA-lg-feature.jpg" style="BORDER&#58;0px solid;" />2018-01-18T05:00:00ZYour source for research and ideas to expand high quality learning and enrichment opportunities. Supporting: School Leadership, After School, Summer and Extended Learning Time, Arts Education and Building Audiences for the Arts.1/17/2018 9:33:33 PM510http://www.wallacefoundation.org/News-and-Media/Blog/Pages/Forms/AllItems.aspxhtmlFalseaspx