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Speaking the Language of Social and Emotional Learning6828GP0|#890cbc1f-f78a-45e7-9bf2-a5986c564667;L0|#0890cbc1f-f78a-45e7-9bf2-a5986c564667|Social and Emotional Learning;GTSet|#a1e8653d-64cb-48e0-8015-b5826f8c5b61<p>What’s in a name? In the fields of education and youth development, the name we give an emerging idea can cause confusion or controversy and even make a difference in whether it is embraced or rejected.</p><p>Nowhere is this more apparent than in the way we talk about learning that does not fall into the category of traditional academics. Interest in helping young people manage their emotions, build positive relationships and navigate social situations has been growing in recent years. But the discourse surrounding this work is rife with vague and competing terminology—from the colloquial (“character,” “grit”) to the clinical (“non-cognitive skills,” “growth mindset”). </p><p>That’s why <a href="http&#58;//www.npr.org/sections/ed/2017/08/14/542070550/social-and-emotional-skills-everybody-loves-them-but-still-cant-define-them">this <em>nprEd</em> article</a> by Anya Kamenetz is so valuable. As an education journalist, Kamenetz was bothered by the proliferation of jargon on this topic. So she created a glossary, updated in summer 2017, to help non-wonks sort through it all.</p><p>This caught our eye at Wallace because we had taken on a similar project. In 2016, in preparation for a new initiative, <a href="/knowledge-center/Pages/SEL-Feedback-and-Communications-Insights-from-the-Field.aspx">we commissioned Edge Research</a>, a Virginia-based market research firm, to look at more than 40 terms and report back on what they meant, how often they were used and how effective they were in motivating parents, educators and policymakers.</p><p>Edge conducted in-depth interviews with 45 leaders in education and afterschool, an online survey of another 1,600 professionals, and focus groups with parents. Like Kamenetz, they concluded there is no “silver bullet” term that works for everyone and in all contexts. They did, however, find that the term “social and emotional learning,” while not without its pitfalls, was familiar and clear to practitioners and policymakers in both K-12 and afterschool and accessible to parents once it was explained.</p><p>That is, in part, why we decided to name our new initiative <a href="/knowledge-center/Social-and-Emotional-Learning/Pages/default.aspx">Partnerships for Social and Emotional Learning</a>. </p><p>Martin West of the Harvard Graduate School of Education tells Kamenetz that the “semantic debate” may already have been settled in favor of “social and emotional learning” and its variants, “but more from exhaustion than from progress toward consensus.” We at Wallace have found working with Edge on this knotty naming problem more invigorating than exhausting, and we hope the results will help researchers, philanthropic organizations, policymakers and practitioners.</p><p> We also recognize that, when discussing the well-being of our young people, a “one-size-fits-all” approach is not the way to go. Each community has different needs and different sensitivities. References to “character” make some people cheer and others suspicious. Associating the word “emotional” with the word “learning” may provoke eye rolls in some places and applause in others. </p><p>It’s important to respect these differences. If we want our children to learn to relate to others in a positive and skillful way, it starts with us.</p>Wallace editorial team792017-11-15T05:00:00ZWhat’s in a name? In the fields of education and youth development, the name we give an emerging idea can cause confusion or controversy and even make a difference in whether it is embraced or rejected.12/4/2017 4:16:45 PMThe Wallace Foundation / News and Media / Wallace Blog / Speaking the Language of Social and Emotional Learning NPR and Wallace Share Interest in Terminology Used to Describe 5154http://www.wallacefoundation.org/News-and-Media/Blog/Pages/Forms/AllItems.aspxhtmlFalseaspx
Helping Out-of-School-Time Providers Get Explicit…About Social and Emotional Learning114GP0|#890cbc1f-f78a-45e7-9bf2-a5986c564667;L0|#0890cbc1f-f78a-45e7-9bf2-a5986c564667|Social and Emotional Learning;GTSet|#a1e8653d-64cb-48e0-8015-b5826f8c5b61<p>Talk to out-of-school-time (OST) providers about the growing interest in social and emotional learning (SEL) across the country, and they’re liable to say, “Finally!” Afterschool and summer programs have&#160;often set out to be&#160;places where children build healthy relationships, learn to navigate social situations and discover what they’re good at and passionate about.&#160; </p><p><img class="wf-Image-Left" alt="jones_183_janetsterns.jpg" src="/News-and-Media/Blog/PublishingImages/Pages/helping-out-of-school-time-providers-get-explicit-about-social-and-emotional-learning/jones_183_janetsterns.jpg" style="margin&#58;5px;width&#58;241px;height&#58;327px;" />Now, OST providers, along with scholars, schools, and foundations, are thinking more deeply than ever about what exactly SEL is and what it takes to promote it. </p><p>As part of that effort, Wallace commissioned Harvard Professor of Education Stephanie Jones to analyze 25 widely used SEL programs. Jones and her team recently published a <a href="/knowledge-center/pages/social-and-emotional-learning-in-out-of-school-time-settings.aspx">research brief</a>, one in a series, that looks specifically at how those programs can be applied in OST settings (only three of the programs were designed primarily for OST). We asked Jones to walk us through the implications of her research for OST organizations.*</p><p><strong>What unique contributions can OST providers make to children’s social and emotional learning?</strong></p><p>Unlike the majority of schools, OST programs tend to have fewer curricular demands, giving them greater flexibility and more opportunity for SEL programming. OST settings also typically provide greater opportunity for students to engage in informal conversations with peers and adults and build positive relationships, which we know is critical to SEL. </p><p><strong>Many OST providers would say that SEL is inherent to what they do. You note, however, that few have “a primary or explicit focus on developing and fostering specific SEL skills.” What are the advantages of adopting a curriculum with a specific focus on SEL?</strong></p><p>It's true that many OST programs address SEL skills in their mission, support a climate that fosters SEL skills, or use general SEL practices and behavior management approaches—and those things are important. But research shows that only programs that follow the elements of SAFE (Sequenced set of activities, Active forms of learning, Focus on building SEL skills, and Explicit SEL learning objectives) improved children's skills and behavior. Adopting an evidence-based curriculum with a specific focus on SEL is one way to make sure those SAFE elements are present. Moreover, evidence-based curricula have usually been tested and refined to ensure the best possible results, and typically come with a variety of supports such as lessons or activities, staff training, and resources like coaching or assessment tools for monitoring progress and improvement.</p><p><strong>How can OST providers interested in adopting an SEL program get started? What are the first steps?</strong></p><p>We recommend OST programs begin by collecting data that will help them make informed decisions. This might include collecting school climate and disciplinary data from a partner school, or talking to families, OST staff, schools, community leaders and other stakeholders about their vision for SEL and the needs they hope the program will address. Drawing from that information, organizations can then identify and prioritize specific needs and goals. Finally, they can use our <a href="/knowledge-center/pages/navigating-social-and-emotional-learning-from-the-inside-out.aspx">Navigating SEL report</a> to identify evidence-based programs and strategies that best meet those needs. There’s a worksheet at the back of the report designed to help them through the process.</p><p><strong>You emphasize the importance of adapting pre-packaged SEL programs so they fit an OST provider’s individual context. Can you give an example of what this looks like in practice?</strong></p><p>An OST program that focuses on building literacy might choose SEL strategies that use books, stories, or poems, whereas an OST program with a focus on sports or health might choose to rely more heavily on strategies that feature games or kinesthetic activities. Similar adaptations can be made to help programs better fit specific behavioral needs, cultural perspectives, student interests and more. It might also make sense to adapt a program to better fit the timing of an afterschool program—perhaps a single lesson is delivered in short periods over the course of multiple days.</p><p><strong>Another brief in this series introduces the concept of “kernels” as a cost-effective and flexible way to build social and emotional skills. Can you give us an overview of your </strong><a href="/knowledge-center/pages/kernels-of-practice-for-sel-low-cost-low-burden-strategies.aspx"><strong>work on kernels</strong></a><strong>? What are they? How can they help OST providers?</strong></p><p>Kernels of SEL practice are short, targeted strategies used by effective programs to build specific skills and effect specific behavioral changes in children. In contrast to more comprehensive SEL programs, a toolkit of SEL kernels is low-cost; requires little time, training, or instruction for staff; and can be customized to individual, classroom, cultural, and site needs. They may be particularly helpful to OST providers in three ways&#58; 1) They’re easy to integrate with the existing structure and mission of an OST program in a variety of ways, either as behavior management tools, short transition activities, or more structured lessons; 2) they enable staff to choose strategies that best suit the needs and interests of the children in their program, keeping the OST space fun and engaging; and 3) they provide opportunities for OST providers to align their SEL work with in-school efforts in a way that is additive rather than repetitive.<br></p><p><img src="/knowledge-center/PublishingImages/stephanie-jones-QA-lg-feature.jpg" alt="" style="margin&#58;5px;" /><br></p><p><em>*This interview has been edited and condensed.</em></p>Wallace editorial team792018-03-27T04:00:00ZHarvard’s Stephanie Jones on Adapting SEL Programs for OST Settings4/4/2018 5:05:33 PMThe Wallace Foundation / News and Media / Wallace Blog / Helping Out-of-School-Time Providers Get Explicit…About Social and Emotional Learning As part of that effort, Wallace 1661http://www.wallacefoundation.org/News-and-Media/Blog/Pages/Forms/AllItems.aspxhtmlFalseaspx
How Do We Define Success for Young People?6961GP0|#890cbc1f-f78a-45e7-9bf2-a5986c564667;L0|#0890cbc1f-f78a-45e7-9bf2-a5986c564667|Social and Emotional Learning;GTSet|#a1e8653d-64cb-48e0-8015-b5826f8c5b61<p>In 2013, Wallace awarded a competitive grant to the University of Chicago Consortium on Chicago School Research to answer a sweeping question&#58; What, besides the three R’s, does a child need to succeed in life? </p><p>The Consortium authors drew on research across a range of fields and disciplines, as well as academic theory and the insights of practitioners, but before they could come to any conclusions, they had to address an even more basic question&#58; What is success, anyway? </p><p dir="ltr" style="text-align&#58;left;"> <img class="wf-Image-Left" alt="NAGAOKA_headshot_2017.jpg" src="/News-and-Media/Blog/PublishingImages/Pages/How-Do-We-Define-Success-for-Young-People/NAGAOKA_headshot_2017.jpg" style="margin&#58;5px;width&#58;144px;" />In the realms of education scholarship and philanthropy, success is often equated with being prepared for college and career, in part because <a href="http&#58;//www.apa.org/pi/ses/resources/publications/children-families.aspx">socioeconomic status is an important factor in overall well-being</a>, and in part because we have a decent idea of how to measure college and career readiness. But Wallace and the Consortium saw a more expansive definition. The report the Consortium released in 2015, <a href="/knowledge-center/Pages/Foundations-for-Young-Adult-Success.aspx"> <em>Foundations for Young Adult Success&#58; A Developmental Framework</em>,</a> says that, in addition to socioeconomic factors, success means “that young people can fulfill individual goals and have the agency and competencies to influence the world around them.” We talked with the report’s lead author, Jenny Nagaoka, about the thinking behind this definition of success.*</p><p> <strong>What were the considerations that led to the Consortium’s definition of young adult success?</strong></p><p>It’s one of the fundamental questions of human existence, right? It was interesting for me because one core area of my research is the transition from high school to college, so college and career readiness is my comfort zone. Like most work in the field, the call for proposals focused on college and career, but we really shifted in our thinking when we started talking to experts. Whether they’re working in a college access program or in higher ed, they see students as human beings. They care not just about whether students have a job and a degree but how they relate to their community&#58; Are they happy? Are they leading satisfying lives, not only professionally but personally? And how can the adults in their lives support that?</p><p> <strong>The framework defines the key factors for success in young adulthood as agency, integrated identity, and competencies (meaning the ability to complete tasks and perform roles). What does it mean, in concrete terms, to have agency and be able to influence the world around you? </strong></p><p>It can be something as small as, if you’re a college student, and you can’t finish your paper by next week because you have three other papers due, do you realize you can talk to your professor, explain your circumstances, and get an extension, that that’s something you might actually have some control over? Or it can be as big as seeing and experiencing racial inequities and becoming engaged in a larger movement.&#160;&#160;</p><p> <strong>Is it possible to be successful in life without fulfilling the goals you set when you’re young?</strong></p><p>Our goals and realities are bound to change over time, but part of the idea of integrated identity is making sense of who you were, who you are now and who you might become. If you wanted to be a painter when you were younger, maybe it’s not what your career ended up being, but you might say, “That was an important part of who I was, and I still on a certain level think of myself as an artist, maybe I can figure out how to integrate that into my life going forward.” </p><p> <strong>Now that the report is a little more than two years old, is there anything you would change about this definition of success?</strong></p><p>There are a lot of questions I don’t have a clear answer to, like, to what extent is valuing individual identity and agency specific to American culture? I’m Japanese American, and Japanese culture is more oriented toward group identity. You’re still undergoing this process of figuring out your place in the world and how to navigate it, but the unit of agency may be more about your family. </p><p> <strong>&#160;</strong></p><p>*This interview has been edited and condensed.</p><p>&#160;</p>Wallace editorial team792017-11-02T04:00:00ZTalking with University of Chicago Researcher Jenny Nagaoka about “One of the Fundamental Questions of Human Existence”3/20/2018 6:42:45 PMThe Wallace Foundation / News and Media / Wallace Blog / How Do We Define Success for Young People Talking with University of Chicago Researcher Jenny Nagaoka about “One of the 529http://www.wallacefoundation.org/News-and-Media/Blog/Pages/Forms/AllItems.aspxhtmlFalseaspx
Helping Afterschool Systems Find a Home9125GP0|#b804f37e-c5dd-4433-a644-37b51bb2e211;L0|#0b804f37e-c5dd-4433-a644-37b51bb2e211|Afterschool;GTSet|#a1e8653d-64cb-48e0-8015-b5826f8c5b61;GP0|#890cbc1f-f78a-45e7-9bf2-a5986c564667;L0|#0890cbc1f-f78a-45e7-9bf2-a5986c564667|Social and Emotional Learning <p>Afterschool providers, schools, government agencies, private funders…they all want to give young people opportunities for growth, learning and fun. But they all have different roles and ways of working, so knitting their efforts together into coordinated systems is no easy task. Cities that set out to build, manage and sustain afterschool systems can use a little guidance along the way.</p><p><img class="wf-Image-Left" alt="sharon_deich1.jpg" src="/News-and-Media/Blog/PublishingImages/Pages/Helping-Afterschool-Systems-Find-a-Home/sharon_deich1.jpg" style="margin&#58;5px;width&#58;319px;" />That’s where the consulting firm FourPoint Education Partners, formerly Cross &amp; Joftus, comes in. From 2012 to 2017, FourPoint provided technical assistance (TA) to the nine cities participating in Wallace’s “next-generation” afterschool system-building initiative, helping them solidify systems that were already in place. (An earlier Wallace initiative had supported five cities starting systems from scratch.) FourPoint drew on that work for a new paper, <em><a href="/knowledge-center/Pages/Governance-Structures-for-City-Afterschool-Systems-Three-Models.aspx">Governance Structures for City Afterschool Systems&#58; Three Models</a></em>, describing three different models for setting up and running an afterschool system.</p><p>We caught up with Sharon Deich, a FourPoint partner, to discuss her role in the initiative and get her perspective on the past, present and future of afterschool system building. </p><p><strong>Describe the work you did as a TA provider for the initiative. </strong></p><p>First, we helped the cities think about how they were going to support their infrastructure when their Wallace money went away. Hand in hand with the finance work was the governance work. How do you create anchor points in the community for the work to deepen and grow, even if one of your key champions—like a mayor, a superintendent or a project lead—were to leave? The third piece was partnerships. Who else do you need to have at the table and then how do you plug them into your governance structure? The last piece was strategy. We worked closely with Wallace, thinking about where the initiative was going and what the needs and opportunities were.</p><p><strong>What is the most important thing you learned over the course of the initiative?</strong></p><p>We came in with the notion that you build a system and then, “Here it is.” But the [actual systems] were very dynamic. More than half the cities changed the home of their system or the organizational structure. In Denver, they started out with an initiative in the mayor’s office and ended up with a networked approach where the mayor’s office, the Boys &amp; Girls Club and the school district were jointly managing the work.</p><p><strong><img class="wf-Image-Right" alt="Governance_v1.jpg" src="/News-and-Media/Blog/PublishingImages/Pages/Helping-Afterschool-Systems-Find-a-Home/Governance_v1.jpg" style="margin&#58;5px;" />How do cities go about finding the right governance structure for their system?</strong></p><p>One consideration is, what’s the primary work of the system? Some systems focus on [program] quality, some on data, some on creating partnerships. They all touch that elephant in different places. If you’re building [new] programs, you might need a different home than if you’re trying to boost the quality of the work. Another factor is, who are your champions? If your mayor is a big champion it may be more logical to be in the mayor’s office or one of the city agencies. </p><p><strong>What do you still not know about system building that you still hope to learn?</strong></p><p>One of the hardest things about system building is communicating what you mean by “system building.” When I work in mainstream education, I often say, “It’s not about what one school is doing. It’s about how the district is supporting all the schools.” I don’t think there’s an equivalent in this mushy space where afterschool lives. Then how do you convince people that investment in system pieces is as important as dollars for programming? </p><p><strong>What does the future of afterschool system building look like to you? </strong></p><p>In this current environment, I can’t see afterschool growing and getting a lot of attention. I worry about the money for 21st Century [Community Learning Centers, a source of federal funding for afterschool]. So, it’s really important that afterschool be part of a broader package of supports and services that school districts and communities want for their kids. Whether it’s social and emotional learning, enrichment, homework help, meals—afterschool can be a delivery vehicle.</p><p>&#160;</p><p>For more information about afterschool systems, check out <a href="/knowledge-center/pages/growing-together-learning-together.aspx">Growing Together, Learning Together</a>.</p><p>&#160;</p> Wallace editorial team792018-01-18T05:00:00ZA paper describes three models for setting up and running an afterschool system.4/4/2018 3:47:42 PMThe Wallace Foundation / News and Media / Wallace Blog / Helping Afterschool Systems Find a Home Talking Technical Assistance with Sharon Deich of FourPoint Education Partners 783http://www.wallacefoundation.org/News-and-Media/Blog/Pages/Forms/AllItems.aspxhtmlFalseaspx
How to Get Kids and Parents Psyched for Summer Learning9210GP0|#ff9563e3-b973-45a7-8ac3-c9f4122f9a13;L0|#0ff9563e3-b973-45a7-8ac3-c9f4122f9a13|Summer Learning;GTSet|#a1e8653d-64cb-48e0-8015-b5826f8c5b61 <p>The National Summer Learning Project—a collaboration between The Wallace Foundation, the RAND Corporation and five urban school districts—has produced <a href="/knowledge-center/Pages/Learning-from-Summer-Effects-of-Voluntary-Summer-Learning-Programs-on-Low-Income-Urban-Youth.aspx">promising evidence</a> that voluntary-attendance summer learning programs can help students succeed in school. But “voluntary” means that districts have to entice families to enroll. </p><p>As part of the project, we engaged Crosby Marketing Communications to help the districts participating do just that.</p><p><span aria-hidden="true"></span><img class="wf-Image-Left" alt="JRosenberg_V3_2X2_5.jpg" src="/News-and-Media/Blog/PublishingImages/Pages/How-to-Get-Kids-and-Parents-Psyched-for-Summer-Learning/JRosenberg_V3_2X2_5.jpg" style="margin&#58;5px;width&#58;374px;" />Crosby conducted focus groups of parents in three cities and found that, while they are motivated by the idea of preparing their children for the next grade, they also believe summer should be a break from the rigors of the school year. The term “summer learning” was not a familiar one, and “summer school” elicited a negative reaction because it evoked a remedial program. Crosby, a firm with expertise in what is known as “social marketing,” worked with the districts to develop social marketing campaigns that would overcome these obstacles. All five exceeded their recruitment goals.</p><p><a href="/knowledge-center/summer-learning/recruitment/pages/default.aspx">A new guide, developed by Crosby, and companion website,</a> presents lessons learned from that successful collaboration and advice to districts interested in launching or improving their own recruitment efforts. We talked to Jeff Rosenberg, an executive vice president at Crosby, about the guide and what he’s learned about encouraging students to attend summer learning programs.*</p><p><strong>Why is it so important for school districts to do a recruitment campaign for their summer learning programs?</strong></p><p>There are two main reasons. The first is, of course, to motivate parents and students to register. The second is that districts want to engage with the students who can benefit the most. To do that, you have to be intentional in who you reach out to and how you communicate.</p><p><strong>What is social marketing? How can school districts use it to recruit for their summer learning programs?</strong></p><p>Social marketing refers to using the principles and practices of marketing for the common good, that is, to raise awareness of a social issue or promote positive behavior change. At Crosby we have a lot of experience in social marketing. For example, we developed the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ national campaign encouraging people to sign up as organ donors. </p><p>By definition, a recruitment campaign for a summer learning program is social marketing. In the case of the National Summer Learning Project, we helped the districts practice what’s known as “community-based” social marketing—using the existing levers in a community to generate behavior change. That involved, for example, relying on the people in the community who are most trusted by parents and students—principals, teachers, and guidance counselors—to deliver the message and promote enrollment.</p><p><strong>What were the most essential/effective techniques that the districts you worked with used to recruit students?</strong></p><p>What the districts found most important was being consistent and assertive in their outreach. One mailing home was not enough to make a connection. The second thing was using several types of outreach. Sending a flyer home by “backpack express” can work, but as all parents know, those flyers don’t always make it to them, so you don’t want to rely on that one approach. The districts also found phone calls to parents to be effective, as well as recruitment events. Third, engaging directly with students is extremely valuable, whether it’s in the form of an event like a pizza party, a piece of mail addressed specifically to them, or a conversation with a teacher. </p><p><strong>Were there any activities that did not prove to be worth the effort or expense?</strong></p><p>A couple of districts conducted home visits, and while they certainly yielded some registrations, they may not justify the intense effort they require. Some districts tried raffles. Parents who sent in a registration form were automatically entered to win a prize. These can work, but we suspect that some parents who registered their children didn’t actually intend to send them to the program; they just wanted a chance at the prize.</p><p><strong>How can districts use the new </strong><a href="/knowledge-center/summer-learning/recruitment/pages/default.aspx">Summer Learning Recruitment website</a><strong> to develop a summer learning marketing campaign?</strong><br> <br> The website is designed so that someone can come in and develop an entire recruitment plan from A to Z. But it can also be a resource for a district that’s already actively recruiting and is just looking for some tips and tools to up its game. There’s guidance on how to develop a written plan. There are also a number of templates from a registration flyer to robocall scripts to talking points that teachers and principals can use when they reach out to parents and students. </p><p><strong>Do you have any final advice for school districts?</strong></p><p>When parents register their children for your summer learning program, view that as the beginning of a relationship. Follow up with a confirmation letter. Consider a “get ready for summer” event in the spring. Schedule robocalls to remind parents and students when your program starts. You’ll find templates in the guide. It’s crucial to use the time between the end of your registration period and the beginning of your summer learning program to get parents and students excited about what’s to come. That will help boost day one attendance.</p><p><em>*This interview has been edited and condensed.</em></p> Wallace editorial team792018-03-06T05:00:00ZCreator of new online guide offers up advice on recruiting for voluntary summer programs3/6/2018 5:20:01 PMThe Wallace Foundation / News and Media / Wallace Blog / How to Get Kids and Parents Psyched for Summer Learning Creator of new online guide offers up advice on recruiting for 388http://www.wallacefoundation.org/News-and-Media/Blog/Pages/Forms/AllItems.aspxhtmlFalseaspx
Making a Case for Investment in the Arts239GP0|#8056f3bc-89c1-4297-814a-3e71542163be;L0|#08056f3bc-89c1-4297-814a-3e71542163be|Building Audiences for the Arts;GTSet|#a1e8653d-64cb-48e0-8015-b5826f8c5b61<p>Support for the arts was once a prosaic topic in America’s national discourse. Politicians, educators and policymakers generally agreed that the arts are an essential source of personal enrichment worthy of institutional investment. <br><br> That consensus began to unravel in 1970s and 80s, however. “Culture wars” and fiscal austerity saw once-cherished programs, including those related to the arts and arts education, slashed from government budgets. It was no longer enough for arts advocates to point to the <em>intrinsic</em> benefits of the arts—the personal joy and enrichment people draw from the arts. They increasingly turned to arguments based on <em>instrumental</em> benefits—the effect of the arts on quantifiable societal indicators such as economic growth and student test scores.<br><br> Despite this change in focus, arts funding has continued to decline. Recent years have seen <a href="http&#58;//www.npr.org/2017/03/16/520401246/trumps-budget-plan-cuts-funding-for-arts-humanities-and-public-media">proposals to eliminate federal funding to the National Endowment for the Arts</a> and deep cuts to arts education in high-poverty schools in cities such as <a href="http&#58;//chicago.suntimes.com/news/layoffs-could-derail-cps-progress-on-arts-education/">Chicago</a> and <a href="http&#58;//www.nbcphiladelphia.com/news/local/Philly-Students-Face-Uncertainties-School-Cutbacks-Music-212290071.html">Philadelphia</a>. <br> <br>Researchers from the RAND Corporation offer an alternative argument that may help build the case for arts funding in <a href="/knowledge-center/Pages/Gifts-of-the-Muse.aspx"><em>Gifts of the Muse&#58; Reframing the Debate About the Benefits of the Arts</em></a>. The study’s authors scoured through decades of literature and found shortcomings in these arguments that focus on instrumental benefits, including some shaky research methods, vague connections between causes and effects and a failure to account for the opportunity costs of investments in the arts. Further, the authors suggest, a focus on instrumental benefits limits the debate to the supply of the arts. By ignoring the intrinsic benefits that compel people to build lasting relationships with the arts, arts advocates may fail to make a case for the essential job of stimulating demand for that supply. </p> <img alt="blog-intro-series-arts-audience-lg-framework-understanding-arts-ch.jpg" src="/News-and-Media/Blog/PublishingImages/Pages/Making-a-Case-for-Investment-in-the-Arts-blog-post/blog-intro-series-arts-audience-lg-framework-understanding-arts-ch.jpg" style="margin&#58;5px;width&#58;783px;" /> <br> <br> The authors offer a number of ideas to bring more nuance and greater clarity to the debate about the arts&#58; <p>&#160;</p><ol><li>Advocates and policymakers must look beyond one-dimensional discussions that weigh intrinsic against instrumental benefits. They must also consider <em>public</em> intrinsic benefits of shared artworks, such as their ability to unite people around particular causes, ideas or emotions.</li><li>Arts advocates must develop a clear, common language to discuss intrinsic benefits, which can often be hard to elucidate.</li><li>Increased research is necessary to better understand the benefits of the arts. The flaws in existing literature about instrumental benefits must be addressed and intrinsic benefits must be better understood.</li><li>Schools and community organizations need greater investment to help them expose children to the arts. Lasting relationships with the arts must begin early, researchers suggest; children who develop interest in the arts are more likely to seek them out—and hence derive benefits from them—as adults.</li></ol><p>At Wallace, we’ve been working to help address some of these recommendations. In 2014, we launched the <a href="/how-we-work/our-work/Pages/Arts-Education-Initiative.aspx">Youth Arts Initiative</a>, a multi-year effort to help the Boys &amp; Girls Clubs of America develop strategies to offer a high-quality arts education to urban youth. An interim evaluation of the initiative has shown that it is possible for clubs to put in place the basic elements of such an education; we are now working with Boys &amp; Girls Clubs to devise ways in which they can do so affordably and sustainably. <br><br> We also support arts organizations as they work to build audiences so more people can experience the intrinsic benefits of the arts. Our latest focus in this area is the <a href="/how-we-work/our-work/Pages/Building-Audiences-for-the-Arts.aspx">Building Audiences for Sustainability Initiative</a>, a six-year effort to determine whether 25 arts organizations can broaden, deepen or diversify their audiences in ways that also contribute to their financial health. The initiative builds on the Wallace Excellence Awards, a previous effort that produced two practical guides to help build audiences&#58; <a href="/knowledge-center/Pages/The-Road-to-Results-Effective-Practices-for-Building-Arts-Audiences.aspx"><em>The Road to Results&#58; Effective Practices for Building Arts Audiences</em></a>, and <a href="/knowledge-center/Pages/Taking-Out-the-Guesswork.aspx"><em>Taking Out the Guesswork&#58; A Guide to Using Research to Build Arts Audiences</em></a>.<br><br> We don’t yet know if these efforts will succeed. But if they do, we hope they will offer models to help youth-serving organizations introduce young people to the arts and established arts organizations nurture such interest so the arts, and their intrinsic benefits, can thrive.</p>Wallace editorial team792017-09-21T04:00:00ZArts advocates must look beyond the socio-economic benefits of the arts, says the RAND Corporation12/4/2017 4:37:14 PMThe Wallace Foundation / News and Media / Wallace Blog / Making a Case for Investment in the Arts Arts advocates must look beyond the socio-economic benefits of the arts, says the 316http://www.wallacefoundation.org/News-and-Media/Blog/Pages/Forms/AllItems.aspxhtmlFalseaspx
Afterschool Systems Show Promise for Learning and Enrichment236GP0|#b804f37e-c5dd-4433-a644-37b51bb2e211;L0|#0b804f37e-c5dd-4433-a644-37b51bb2e211|Afterschool;GTSet|#a1e8653d-64cb-48e0-8015-b5826f8c5b61<p>“Proof of principle.” It’s a clinical-sounding phrase derived from the search for new medications.</p><p>But oh, what excitement it generated here at Wallace when we first read it in print in 2010, because the phrase also means that something has shown promise and warrants further development. There it was, on pg. 74 of a RAND Corp. report, <a href="/knowledge-center/Pages/Hours-of-Opportunity-Volumes-I-II-III.aspx"> <em>Hours of Opportunity</em>, </a>which examined Wallace-supported afterschool program efforts in five cities. For years, organizations in those communities—Boston; Chicago; New York City; Providence, R.I.; and Washington, D.C.—had been working to see if a then-novel concept was possible. </p><p>The idea? To have the major groups involved in afterschool programs—parks, libraries, schools, recreation programs, government agencies and others—collaborate to build a coherent system of high-quality afterschool programming, especially for the neediest children and teens. </p><p>The cities had embarked on this effort in the early 2000s, not knowing whether afterschool coordination on a wide scale and involving numerous players was possible. But apparently, the after-school systems idea had something to it. “This initiative provided a proof of principle—that organizations across cities could work together toward increasing access, quality, data-based decision-making, and sustainability,” RAND concluded. </p><p>In other words, the cities had demonstrated the feasibility of launching afterschool systems with the potential to improve programs and make them more readily available. Ultimately, that meant kids might have a better shot at filling their spare time with enrichment and learning, rather than risk. </p><p>Hours helped guide what we called our next-generation afterschool effort, in which nine other cities with system work underway received support to boost their efforts, especially in the collection and analysis of data. That work, in turn, gave rise to several other notable reports. One, an updated Wallace Perspective called <a href="/knowledge-center/Pages/Growing-Together-Learning-Together.aspx"> <em>Growing Together, Learning Together,</em> </a>found that building strong afterschool systems required four key elements&#58; leadership from all the major players, a coordinating entity, use of data and efforts to bolster program quality.&#160; </p><p>By 2013, we had some reason to believe that system-building was more than a flash in the pan. A Wallace-commissioned scan found that at least 77 of the nation’s 275 largest cities were endeavoring to build afterschool systems. </p><p>What’s the latest figure? The answer will have to wait for another study. </p>Wallace editorial team792017-09-21T04:00:00ZOrganizations band together to create a powerful network of afterschool programming4/4/2018 4:36:45 PMThe Wallace Foundation / News and Media / Wallace Blog / Afterschool Systems Show Promise for Learning and Enrichment Organizations band together to create a powerful network of 321http://www.wallacefoundation.org/News-and-Media/Blog/Pages/Forms/AllItems.aspxhtmlFalseaspx
Wallace’s Ten Most Downloaded Publications of All Time6834GP0|#6b3d2eef-1f47-4b7e-b105-bd18b7e1c384;L0|#06b3d2eef-1f47-4b7e-b105-bd18b7e1c384|News;GTSet|#a1e8653d-64cb-48e0-8015-b5826f8c5b61<p>Since launching our Knowledge center in 2003, thousands of people visit and find our library of published research, reports and other tools every day. So, what are they looking for? </p><p>Here’s a list of our Top 10 Most Downloaded resources as of fall 2017&#58;</p><ol><li> <strong> <em> <a href="/knowledge-center/Pages/How-Leadership-Influences-Student-Learning.aspx">How Leadership Influences Student Learning </a>&#160;</em>(Published September 2004) – 562,902 downloads</strong><br> In this hallmark publication on school leadership—our most downloaded report of all time—the authors suggest and investigate the notion that in order to improve schools, focus should be placed on not just teachers, but also on principals and administrators. </li><li> <strong> <em> <a href="/knowledge-center/Pages/The-School-Principal-as-Leader-Guiding-Schools-to-Better-Teaching-and-Learning.aspx">The School Principal as Leader&#58; Guiding Schools to Better Teaching and Learning</a></em> (Published January 2012) – 372,094 downloads</strong><br> This report concludes that there are five key actions that effective school leaders do particularly well, including shaping a vision of academic success for all students, and cultivating leadership in others.</li><li> <em> <a href="/knowledge-center/Pages/Investigating-the-Links-to-Improved-Student-Learning.aspx"> <strong>Learning From Leadership&#58; Investigating the Links to Improved Student Learning</strong></a></em><strong> (Published July 2010) – 108,970 downloads</strong><br> Based on six years of quantitative data, this report confirms that effective school leadership leads to student success, showing that teachers, principals, district leaders and state policymakers all have an impact on learning.</li><li> <strong> <em> <a href="/knowledge-center/Pages/Three-Essentials-to-Improving-Schools.aspx">The Three Essentials&#58; Improving Schools Requires District Vision, District and State Support, and Principal Leadership</a></em> (Published October 2010) – 95,857 downloads</strong><br> Published by the Southern Regional Education Board, this report examines how school districts and states are failing to provide principals with what they need to turn around America’s challenged middle and high schools.</li><li> <strong> <em> <a href="/knowledge-center/Pages/The-Making-of-the-Principal-Five-Lessons-in-Leadership-Training.aspx">The Making of the Principal&#58; Five Lessons in Leadership Training</a></em> (Published June 2012) – 74,323 downloads</strong><br> Like many of the education leadership reports before this one, <em>Making of the Principal</em> highlights the problems facing principal training programs and offers five steps to better training.</li><li> <strong> <em> <a href="/knowledge-center/Resources-for-Financial-Management/Pages/Program-Based-Budget-Template.aspx">Strong Nonprofits Microsite&#58; Program Based Budget Builder</a></em> (Published February 2013) – 72,373 downloads</strong><br> This tool, from our nonprofit financial management microsite, allows an organization to build a budget and list revenue across different programs and functions, including allocation of personnel and direct and indirect non-personnel expenses.</li><li> <strong> <em> <a href="/knowledge-center/Pages/Preparing-School-Leaders.aspx">Preparing School Leaders for a Changing World&#58; Lessons from Exemplary Leadership Development Programs</a></em> – Final Report (Published April 2007) – 72,197 downloads</strong><br> In this groundbreaking report, Stanford University authors provide case studies and guidelines to help district and state policymakers reinvent how principals are prepared for their jobs. </li><li> <strong> <em> <a href="/knowledge-center/resources-for-financial-management/Pages/A-Five-Step-Guide-to-Budget-Development.aspx">Strong Nonprofits Microsite&#58; A Five-Step Guide to Budget Development</a></em> (Published February 2013)&#160; – 60,387 downloads</strong><br> This guide, also from our nonprofit financial management microsite, provides a team-based approach to budget development, including goals, personnel and process.</li><li> <strong> <em> <a href="/knowledge-center/Pages/The-Effective-Principal.aspx">The Effective Principal&#58; Five Pivotal Practices that Shape Instructional Leadership</a></em> (Published April 2012) – 50,675 downloads</strong><br> The most recently released publication on our top-10 list, the <em>Effective Principal</em> highlights five practices that characterize the leadership of principals who can make a difference in teaching and learning.</li><li> <strong> <em> <a href="/knowledge-center/Pages/How-Museums-Can-Become-Visitor-Centered.aspx">Services to People&#58; Challenges and Rewards. How Museums Can Become More Visitor-Centered</a></em> (Published April 2001) – 40,954 downloads</strong><br> This one dips way back into our archives, but practitioners looking to create a visitor-centered approach to museums still find it useful. </li></ol>Wallace editorial team792017-10-19T04:00:00ZPrincipals lead the way in our list of most-downloaded publications3/20/2018 6:46:17 PMThe Wallace Foundation / News and Media / Wallace Blog / Wallace’s Ten Most Downloaded Publications of All Time Principals lead the way in our list of most-downloaded publications 177http://www.wallacefoundation.org/News-and-Media/Blog/Pages/Forms/AllItems.aspxhtmlFalseaspx
To Build Afterschool Systems, Communities Must “Figure It Out, Then Figure It Out Again”9064GP0|#b804f37e-c5dd-4433-a644-37b51bb2e211;L0|#0b804f37e-c5dd-4433-a644-37b51bb2e211|Afterschool;GTSet|#a1e8653d-64cb-48e0-8015-b5826f8c5b61<p>Seeing is believing, the saying goes, and Priscilla Little has seen the benefits of afterschool systems up close for more than two decades. From 1996 to 2010, she oversaw the Harvard Family Research Project’s afterschool efforts. In 2012, she became the manager of Wallace’s “next-generation” <a href="/knowledge-center/after-school/Pages/default.aspx">afterschool system building effort</a>, the successor to an initiative, begun in 2003, to increase access to high-quality afterschool programming by coordinating the work of program providers, government agencies, private funders and other players. </p><p>Now that her time at Wallace has come to a close, we asked Priscilla to reflect on her experience in this evolving field.*</p><p> <strong>How has the field of afterschool system building changed since you started working with Wallace?</strong></p><p>On a base numbers level, there are more communities trying to do it. And we now have cross-sector community collaborations that weren’t in place 10 years ago. Afterschool systems may start off as straight-up networks of programs, but they quickly embrace the fact that they’re operating in a larger community context. They recognize that they need to connect with other initiatives that touch young people and try to be more efficient, streamlined and coordinated in their approach. More afterschool systems are also working intentionally with school districts now, partly in response to education reform and greater openness on the part of schools. Another thing I’m seeing is increasing language about afterschool as a solution to workforce challenges—not just because it solves a childcare issue for the workforce but because it promotes the kind of skills employers need. It’s not that afterschool programs are doing anything different, but the way they’re being talked about is different.</p><p> <strong>What is the most important thing you’ve learned about system building in your time with Wallace?</strong></p><p>One thing I’ve come to appreciate is the importance of coordination that<a href="/knowledge-center/Pages/Growing-Together-Learning-Together.aspx"> fits the local context</a>. What was a revelation for many of the sites in the Wallace initiatives is that coordination is going to change over time because community context changes. The notion of “one and done” is just not realistic. I could tell you many stories of systems that incubate in one place and land in another, and that’s an inherently good thing. That disruptive change is healthy for a system. Communities just want to figure out, “What is this going to look like?” And I tell them, “Good enough, good until. We’ll figure it out, and when something new comes along, we’ll figure it out again.” </p><p> <strong>What do you not know about system building that you still hope to learn?</strong></p><p>What I keep getting asked is, “How do we sustain this work absent big resources from foundations?” How does it become part of the course of nurturing children to have these systems in place? Beyond the systems approach, how do we change education so that afterschool becomes part of the equation without school districts co-opting it? Wallace’s new <a href="/knowledge-center/Social-and-Emotional-Learning/Pages/default.aspx">Partnerships for Social and Emotional Learning initiative</a> is partly about how we can help both school and afterschool systems do what they do well but coordinate better.</p><p> <strong>What does the future of afterschool system building look like to you? </strong></p><p>Continuing to build systems is important because they’re good for providers and kids. The next frontier is changing the conversation so that it starts with equity and what young people need to be successful, not what we can do. We’re quick to jump to institutions and settings without asking, “What is your vision for young people in this community? How can the organizations in the community support that vision?”</p><p>*This interview has been edited and condensed.</p>Wallace editorial team792017-11-02T04:00:00ZInsights from Former Initiative Manager Priscilla Little3/20/2018 6:44:11 PMThe Wallace Foundation / News and Media / Wallace Blog / To Build Afterschool Systems, Communities Must “Figure It Out, Then Figure It Out Again From 1996 to 2010, she oversaw the 2714http://www.wallacefoundation.org/News-and-Media/Blog/Pages/Forms/AllItems.aspxhtmlFalseaspx
Your Top Picks and Ours7063GP0|#6b3d2eef-1f47-4b7e-b105-bd18b7e1c384;L0|#06b3d2eef-1f47-4b7e-b105-bd18b7e1c384|News;GTSet|#a1e8653d-64cb-48e0-8015-b5826f8c5b61<p>Wallace maintains an ever-growing collection of reports, articles, videos and other resources that we have commissioned or produced since the 1990s. &#160;Indeed, the Knowledge Center housing these 300-plus publications covering education leadership, learning and enrichment, and the arts is the heart of our <a href="/">website</a>. Over the last year, we added more than 20 new items to our library. As 2017 draws to a close, we thought we’d look back to see which resources, old and new, resonated most with our readers and which ones we on the Wallace editorial staff think are up and comers.&#160; </p><p>With that here’s our list of Top 10 Downloads of 2017&#58;</p> <table width="750"><tbody><tr><td style="padding&#58;10px 30px;background-color&#58;#7c0041;"> <font style="text-align&#58;center;color&#58;#ffffff;"> <strong>TOP 10 DOWNLOADS FROM JANUARY - NOVEMBER 2017</strong></font></td></tr></tbody></table><table width="750"><tbody><tr style="background-color&#58;#e6e690;"><td style="padding&#58;10px;">Rank</td><td style="padding&#58;10px;">Date Released</td><td style="padding&#58;10px;">Title</td><td style="padding&#58;10px;">YTD</td></tr><tr style="background-color&#58;#fafbed;"><td style="padding&#58;10px;">1</td><td style="padding&#58;10px;">Jan. 2012</td><td style="padding&#58;10px;"> <a href="/knowledge-center/pages/the-school-principal-as-leader-guiding-schools-to-better-teaching-and-learning.aspx"> <em>The School Principal as Leader&#58; Guiding Schools to Better Teaching and Learning</em></a></td><td style="padding&#58;10px;">109,477</td></tr><tr style="background-color&#58;#f7f7db;"><td style="padding&#58;10px;">2</td><td style="padding&#58;10px;">Sep. 2004</td><td style="padding&#58;10px;"> <a href="/knowledge-center/pages/how-leadership-influences-student-learning.aspx"> <em>How Leadership Influences Student Learning</em></a></td><td style="padding&#58;10px;">91,172</td></tr><tr style="background-color&#58;#fafbed;"><td style="padding&#58;10px;">3</td><td style="padding&#58;10px;">Aug. 2010</td><td style="padding&#58;10px;"> <a href="/knowledge-center/pages/three-essentials-to-improving-schools.aspx"> <em>The Three Essentials&#58; Improving Schools Requires District Vision, District and State Support, and Principal Leadership</em></a></td><td style="padding&#58;10px;">33,727</td></tr><tr style="background-color&#58;#f7f7db;"><td style="padding&#58;10px;">4</td><td style="padding&#58;10px;">Feb. 2013</td><td style="padding&#58;10px;"> <strong>StrongNonprofits.org&#58; </strong><a href="/knowledge-center/resources-for-financial-management/pages/fixed-asset-and-depreciation-schedule.aspx"> Fixed Asset and Depreciation Schedule (EXCEL)</a></td><td style="padding&#58;10px;">25,969</td></tr><tr style="background-color&#58;#fafbed;"><td style="padding&#58;10px;">5</td><td style="padding&#58;10px;">Jul. 2010</td><td style="padding&#58;10px;"> <a href="/knowledge-center/Pages/Investigating-the-Links-to-Improved-Student-Learning.aspx"> <em>Learning From Leadership&#58; Investigating the Links to Improved Student Learning</em></a></td><td style="padding&#58;10px;">24,802</td></tr><tr style="background-color&#58;#f7f7db;"><td style="padding&#58;10px;">6</td><td style="padding&#58;10px;">Feb. 2013</td><td style="padding&#58;10px;"> <strong>StrongNonprofits.org&#58; </strong><a href="/knowledge-center/resources-for-financial-management/pages/program-based-budget-template.aspx"> Program Based Budget Builder (EXCEL)</a></td><td style="padding&#58;10px;">22,159</td></tr><tr style="background-color&#58;#fafbed;"><td style="padding&#58;10px;">7</td><td style="padding&#58;10px;">May 2017</td><td style="padding&#58;10px;"> <a href="/knowledge-center/Pages/Navigating-Social-and-Emotional-Learning-from-the-Inside-Out.aspx"> <em>Navigating Social and Emotional Learning from the Inside Out</em></a></td><td style="padding&#58;10px;">18,915</td></tr><tr style="background-color&#58;#f7f7db;"><td style="padding&#58;10px;">8</td><td style="padding&#58;10px;">Feb. 2013</td><td style="padding&#58;10px;"> <strong>StrongNonprofits.org&#58; </strong> <a href="/knowledge-center/resources-for-financial-management/pages/a-five-step-guide-to-budget-development.aspx"> A Five-Step Guide to Budget Development</a> </td><td style="padding&#58;10px;">18,459</td></tr><tr style="background-color&#58;#fafbed;"><td style="padding&#58;10px;">9</td><td style="padding&#58;10px;">Jun. 2012</td><td style="padding&#58;10px;"> <a href="/knowledge-center/Pages/The-Making-of-the-Principal-Five-Lessons-in-Leadership-Training.aspx"> <em>The Making of the Principal&#58; Five Lessons in Leadership Training </em></a></td><td style="padding&#58;10px;">16,691</td></tr><tr style="background-color&#58;#f7f7db;"><td style="padding&#58;10px;">10</td><td style="padding&#58;10px;">Jun. 2011</td><td style="padding&#58;10px;"> <a href="/knowledge-center/Pages/Making-Summer-Count-How-Summer-Programs-Can-Boost-Childrens-Learning.aspx"> <em>Making Summer Count&#58; How Summer Programs Can Boost Children’s Learning </em></a></td><td style="padding&#58;10px;">15,708</td></tr></tbody></table><p>&#160;</p><p>So, what struck us? </p><p> <strong>2017 Serves Up a Runaway Best-Seller </strong></p><p>Look at #7 on the list. It’s the only release from this year. In fact, it’s the only release since 2013!&#160; The other publications on the Top 10 list have had much more time and exposure to help them&#160;reach&#160; practitioners, policymakers and others interested in the issues we work on. &#160;Why would a publication barely six months old have such a following?</p><p>Simple answer&#58; social and emotional learning (SEL). </p><p>We’ve known for some time that interest in SEL—the skills outside of academics that students need to be successful in school and later in life—was on the rise. A growing body of research, too, has affirmed the benefits of developing strong SEL skills. What we didn’t know was how much guidance practitioners were looking for. Published in May, <a href="/knowledge-center/pages/navigating-social-and-emotional-learning-from-the-inside-out.aspx"> <em>Navigating Social and Emotional Learning from the Inside Out</em></a> offers a look at 25 top U.S. SEL programs, allowing users to do a scan across programs to assess grade level, settings, the skills they wish to develop and other features so users can adapt programs to their context. As of November 30, 2017 (the latest date for which we have figures), the publication had been downloaded&#160;almost&#160;19,000 times from our website, making it the most popular new release we’ve ever had and pointing to the need for even more research and tools in this growing field. </p><p>We’ve got more evidence on this point. Coming in at the number two spot of top 2017 releases, with 3,540 downloads since May, is a special issue of the journal <a href="/knowledge-center/pages/the-future-of-children-social-and-emotional-learning.aspx"> <em>The Future of Children</em></a> that examines the development of SEL in school and afterschool settings.&#160; </p><p> <strong>Readers Reach for a Classic </strong> <br> <a href="/knowledge-center/Pages/How-Leadership-Influences-Student-Learning.aspx"> <em>How Leadership Influences Student Learning</em></a> may be getting long in the tooth—it was first published in 2004—but it continues to attract large numbers of readers and has become the closest thing that Wallace has to a classic. Written by researchers at the University of Minnesota and the University of Toronto, the report helped establish the importance of school principals to student success. Since it was first issued, this meta-analysis has been downloaded more than half a million times, suggesting there’s an ongoing need for understanding the ins and outs of why school leadership matters.&#160; </p><p> <strong>Nonprofits Welcome Practical Guidance</strong><br> Almost five years ago, Wallace launched a website intended to help afterschool organizations and other nonprofits manage their finances. <a href="http&#58;//www.strongnonprofits.org/">Strongnonprofits.org</a> &#160;is a collection of free tools, how-tos, articles and other features assembled and in some cases created by Fiscal Management Associates, a leading national consulting firm working with nonprofits on financial management matters. Three of the site’s resources made our Top 10, a testament to the appetite among nonprofits for guidance on how to strengthen their financial muscle.&#160; <strong></strong></p><p> <strong> <em>Staff Picks</em></strong><br> Sometimes download numbers tell only part of the story.&#160;Four reports published this year merit a special mention for breaking ground in their subject areas, even if they didn’t break into the Top 10.&#160;&#160; </p><p> <strong>Arts&#160; + Tweens = Good Read </strong> <br> Nine in 10 Americans believe that the arts are part of a well-rounded education, according to a 2016 survey by Americans for the Arts. For disadvantaged children, however, high-quality opportunities to experience the arts, both in school and out, can be scarce. Enter the Boys &amp; Girls Clubs of America (BGCA), which managed in three communities to introduce the sorts of arts education programs one would normally find in smaller, more specialized organizations, according to a report by Research for Action and McClanahan Associates. <a href="/knowledge-center/pages/raising-the-barre-and-stretching-the-canvas.aspx"> <em>Raising the Barre and Stretching the Canvas&#58; Implementing High-Quality Arts Programming in a National Youth Serving Organization</em></a> shows how BGCA navigated some tricky terrain to develop promising programs that meet general principles of a high-quality arts education. Surveys cited in the report show that large majorities of participants in the BGCA programs found their teachers competent, their studios engaging and their environments safe, friendly and comfortable.</p><p> <strong>Art + Millennials = Another Good Read</strong><br> ​​Arts organizations, meanwhile, are eager to learn how they can attract the older siblings of those tweens. <a href="/knowledge-center/pages/building-millennial-audiences-barriers-and-opportunities.aspx"> <em>Building Millennial Audiences&#58; Barriers and Opportunities</em></a> garnered surprising interest among readers in offering clues to action—including recognizing that several obstacles may be keeping 20-somethings from greater participation in the arts. Among them are misperceptions about ticket prices and leisure events that compete for millennials’ time.</p><p> <strong>A Novel Study Makes a Debut</strong><br> From the world of arts into the world of number crunching, &#160;<a href="/knowledge-center/Pages/what-it-takes-to-operate-and-maintain-principal-pipelines-costs-and-other-resources.aspx"><em>What It Takes to Operate and Maintain Principal Pipelines&#58; Costs and Other Resources</em></a> is the RAND Corp.’s examination of the price tag when school districts embark on ensuring that school leaders are properly trained, hired and supported on the job. &#160;The big finding, based on RAND’s first-of-its-kind review of expenditures by six major urban school districts in a Wallace effort to promote the development of a large corps of highly effective principals, was the following&#58; The costs are only a small slice of annual district spending—an average of about 0.4 percent of yearly expenditures. </p><p> <strong>Readers Look for Ways to Expand What Works </strong> <br> <em>In a way, </em> <a href="/knowledge-center/Pages/how-to-scale-up-social-programs-that-work.aspx"> <em>Strategies to Scale Up Social Programs&#58; Pathways, Partnerships and Fidelity</em></a>&#160;is a study in optimism, an examination of efforts so successful that people decided to spread them around. The report explores 45 programs tackling everything from climate change to hunger to unemployment. Each had evidence of effectiveness and each extended its reach through partnerships. The report finds patterns among the various expansion routes the organizations took—and apparently readers are taking note. They have downloaded the report more than 2,200 times since its September launch.</p><p>Not a bad number for a report only three months old.&#160;&#160; &#160;</p>Wallace editorial team792017-12-14T05:00:00ZWe Expanded Our Library This Year. Which Items Stood Out?4/4/2018 4:16:43 PMThe Wallace Foundation / News and Media / Wallace Blog / Your Top Picks and Ours We Expanded Our Library This Year Posted: 12/14/2017 Author: Wallace editorial team 3052http://www.wallacefoundation.org/News-and-Media/Blog/Pages/Forms/AllItems.aspxhtmlFalseaspx

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