Wallace Blog

 

 

Focusing on Principal Wellness: 6 Questions for School Leaders19363​ <p>​For many, this year has been the start of a return to normalcy. But the overwhelming challenges facing schools, students and principals continue to evolve. According to <a href="https&#58;//survey.nassp.org/2022/?__hstc=180157371.bac77909d6215da4a21e8c328eb24c35.1664827493701.1665580618882.1665602121992.5&amp;__hssc=180157371.4.1665602121992&amp;__hsfp=3339776304#leaders" target="_blank">NASSP’s 2022 Survey of America’s School Leaders and High School Students</a>, one out of two school leaders say their stress level is so high, they are considering a career change or retirement, and three-quarters of school leaders report they needed help with their mental or emotional health last year. </p><p>That’s why the focus of this year’s <a href="https&#58;//www.principalsmonth.org/celebrate-your-principal/" target="_blank">National Principals Month</a> is on principal wellness. Celebrated every October, National Principals Month is an opportunity to honor school principals for their leadership and tireless dedication to their students and schools.</p><p>We spoke with four principals—who, together, have more than 30 years of experience as school leaders—about what inspired them to become principals, how they deal with burnout and the impact of the pandemic, among other topics. Their responses have been edited for length and clarity.</p><p> <img src="/News-and-Media/Blog/PublishingImages/Pages/focusing-on-principal-wellness-6-questions-for-school-leaders/Kimberly_Greer_Photo.jpg" alt="Kimberly_Greer_Photo.jpg" class="wf-Image-Right" style="margin&#58;5px;width&#58;189px;height&#58;252px;" />​<em>Kimberly Greer started her fifth year as principal at Langley High School in McLean, Virginia, this year.</em></p><p> <em> </em></p><p> <strong>What inspired you to become a principal?</strong></p><div> <em>​</em>I have been inspired by the need to ensure success for all students. While it is easy to focus on the majority, we must make sure all students are seen, respected and their needs properly addressed. I feel it is my calling to ensure each student is valued and feels a part of their school community.</div><div> <strong><br></strong></div><div> <strong>Reflecting on the past two years, what are some of the biggest impacts that the pandemic has had on your job?</strong><br></div><div> <strong><br></strong></div><p>Being a principal has never been easy. However, since the pandemic, school leaders have had to work on supporting the emotional needs of stakeholders. In addition to meeting the needs of students, we’ve had to address the emotional wellness of staff members. Mental health challenges faced by students are greater. The biggest impact of the pandemic is it has provided opportunities to have conversations regarding mental health. We’ve used the pandemic as a chance to normalize these conversations and to remove the stigma associated with the topic. </p><p> <strong>There have been many articles circulating about principal burnout. Have you experienced this and if so, how have you dealt with it? </strong></p><p>I haven’t experienced burnout, but weariness has been felt at varying times over the past two years. I approach each day as a new opportunity. This has helped me to avoid burnout. Educational leadership isn’t easy. What keeps me going is the recognition that I have thousands of students and their families depending on me, as well as hundreds of staff members. I must provide support to all stakeholders so we are able to remain focused on students and their success.</p><p> <strong>What do principals need in order to feel supported?</strong></p><p>We need first and foremost for our humanity to be recognized. We are people who carry the weight of our schools, divisions and communities on our shoulders. We need people to check on us and make sure we're okay. Concern for our mental and physical wellness goes a long way. We are strong individuals, but we are human.<br></p><p> <strong>What advice do you have for aspiring principals?</strong></p><p>Build your network. Realize you can’t do it alone. Have fun. The job is tough, but find joy in the work. Young people are incredible, and we’re blessed to be a part of their journeys.</p><p> <strong>What is the best part about being a principal? What experience will stay with you long after you’ve retired?</strong></p><p>The best part is seeing your vision realized. It is incredible to consider that our decisions today will continue to impact our students long after they graduate. The experience that will stay with me is hearing seniors at last year’s graduation recite the sign-off I have used during the morning announcements since I became principal in 2018. This gesture meant they were listening and taking to heart the message I work daily to impart to students&#58; be kind-hearted human beings who take care of yourselves and one another.<br><br> </p><p> <em> <img src="/News-and-Media/Blog/PublishingImages/Pages/focusing-on-principal-wellness-6-questions-for-school-leaders/Twainna_Fortner_Calhoun_photo.jpg" alt="Twainna_Fortner_Calhoun_photo.jpg" class="wf-Image-Left" style="margin&#58;5px;width&#58;195px;height&#58;195px;" />Twainna Calhoun, principal at Good Hope Middle School in Ouachita Parish, Louisiana, has been in school administration for 20 years and has been principal at her current school for 17 years. </em></p><p> <strong>What inspired you to become a principal?</strong></p><p>I think I've always had leadership in me. I have nine siblings, and I was led by awesome principals during my career. Every one of my principals saw something in me that they also thought would make a good leader. The legacy laid out in front of me inspired me to be a principal.</p><p> <strong>Reflecting on the past two years, what are some of the biggest impacts that the pandemic has had on your job? </strong></p><p>The isolation. The students, teachers and parents had been social distancing. And we’re finally getting back to where we were in March 2020. The isolation had a huge impact on my building and getting everyone motivated again. It seemed like the students post-pandemic lost motivation and had given up, but we just had to make it fun again. For instance, we started having pep rallies and spirit days again. The kids really enjoy that. That’s part of the school experience. The social aspect is important as well as the academics.</p><p> <strong>There have been many articles circulating about principal burnout. Have you experienced this and if so, how have you dealt with it? </strong></p><p>I have, definitely. As a matter of fact, this time last year I was job searching. I just thought I couldn’t do it anymore because one thing after another was compounding. But my principal colleagues—being a part of NASSP, being a part of the Louisiana Association of Principals—have helped me. Listening to their stories and knowing that I’m not alone helped me realize I can get through this. I’m not trying to be cliché, but the first day of school this year was probably the most excited I’ve been because I just put the spirit back into being a principal. I was born to do this. I came back and remembered my purpose. There are going to be roadblocks. My students, my staff and my own children are what inspired me to keep going. </p><p> <strong>What do principals need in order to feel supported?</strong></p><p>Districts can show support by attending our sporting events. It is helpful for district personnel to drop in and visit, not simply when there is a crisis. An &quot;atta girl&quot; goes a long way when you are a building leader. </p><p> <strong>What advice do you have for aspiring principals?</strong></p><p>Be confident. Because you are the building leader. You have to make decisions that are not popular, but you have to be confident in what you do. You have to be intentional, and be a good listener. Listening goes beyond paying attention when other people talk. It’s your response. You have to be a motivator. But I think the most important thing is being confident in what you do. You have to be prepared to be the decision maker. Take the bad and the good. You’re going to get the praise one day, and not so good feedback the next. Be organized. Be balanced, and be a visionary. You have to see beyond tomorrow.</p><p> <strong>What is the best part about being a principal? What experience will stay with you long after you’ve retired?</strong></p><p>The best part of being a principal is building relationships. I was born and raised here, and I’ve been in my building for 17 years. I’ve built relationships with teachers, and even after they’ve retired, I still communicate with them. One of my students is about to be my dentist now. Another student is now a teacher in our building, and he said I inspired him to become a teacher. I’ve actually had three students come back to teach. So just that experience of them coming back and wanting to be part of the process will stay with me long after I’ve retired.<br><br></p><p> <em><img src="/News-and-Media/Blog/PublishingImages/Pages/focusing-on-principal-wellness-6-questions-for-school-leaders/Aaron_Huff_Headshot.jpeg" alt="Aaron_Huff_Headshot.jpeg" class="wf-Image-Right" style="margin&#58;5px;width&#58;189px;height&#58;284px;" />Aaron Huff, principal at Benjamin Bosse High School in Evansville, Indiana, spent three years working as an assistant principal and has now been a principal for 11 years. </em></p><p> <strong>What inspired you to become a principal?</strong></p><p>I started working at the YMCA in youth outreach my senior year of high school and continued that work through college as an afterschool care supervisor while attending Ball State University. Upon graduation, I returned to my school district and started working as a site coordinator. During my time at BSU, my mother had become an assistant principal, and I watched her impact generations of children and families. She became a highly recognizable assistant principal and principal. One who garnered the respect of the whole community. People always spoke about the impact she had on their life. Little did I know that my becoming a principal would lead to me replacing my mother as the principal of Bosse High School. </p><p> <strong>Reflecting on the past two years, what are some of the biggest impacts that the pandemic has had on your job? </strong></p><p>I would say the biggest impacts the pandemic has had on the principalship relate to the mental health of students and staff. Also, I have seen an increase in student apathy. We are now experiencing the ripple effects of a prolonged pause in education. There are economic impacts and prolonged health impacts. The shortage of teachers and administration is a real challenge for the future of education.</p><p> <strong>There have been many articles circulating about principal burnout. Have you experienced this and if so, how have you dealt with it? </strong></p><p>I'd be lying if I said I hadn't. I am just fortunate to have a village around me that is extremely supportive and encouraging. I work with great individuals and students that keep me motivated. Burnout is experienced when I have to deal with the outside noise around education that prevents me from doing the things most important to our children and advancing our school. I also try to find the &quot;balance,&quot; literally and figuratively. I have taken up hot yoga, and that time on the mat is precious and is the opportunity for me to hit the reset button.</p><p> <strong>What do principals need in order to feel supported?</strong></p><p>I think principals need to be heard. Their voice then causes decision-makers to reevaluate, reconsider and adjust policy, practice and protocols that negatively impact the principalship. Acknowledge and support the work principals are doing to improve student educational outcomes.</p><p> <strong>What advice do you have for aspiring principals?</strong></p><p>Anyone can put time and energy into a position. As a principal, pour your heart into it, and keep students at the center. Organizations can't grow without great leaders willing to grow the people around them while they grow. Seek out various perspectives and schools of thought. Don't be consumed by maintaining day-to-day operations. Choose to think outside the box, and give permission to the people you lead to think outside the box. </p><p> <strong>What is the best part about being a principal? What experience will stay with you long after you’ve retired?</strong></p><p>The students, families, colleagues and friends you interact with daily. They become your family. I love the ability to alter a young person's life for the better.&#160; I value collaborative leadership and learning from others. Giving space for teachers to become leaders within the building. Creating an environment that students, families and community members love and want to be a part of. I cherish the connections with students and former students. Those are great memories. When you run into former students in the community, and they simply say thank you and share what they are doing now is what will stay with me.<br><br></p><p> <em><img src="/News-and-Media/Blog/PublishingImages/Pages/focusing-on-principal-wellness-6-questions-for-school-leaders/Lawson_Charles_Derrick__Headshot_2022.jpg" alt="Lawson_Charles_Derrick__Headshot_2022.jpg" class="wf-Image-Left" style="margin&#58;5px;width&#58;159px;height&#58;239px;" />Derrick Lawson has been principal at Indio High School in Indio, California, for seven years and is in his 37th year of working in education. <strong></strong></em></p><p> <strong>What inspired you to become a principal?</strong></p><p>During my high school years, I was facing some significant personal life challenges. One of the assistant principals at my high school went the second, third and fourth mile to make a difference in my life and to ensure that the potential he saw in me would come to fruition. He and his wife both invested time and resources to help me stay connected to school and get through the circumstances that could have resulted in my going off in a direction that would have led me to become a very different person from who I am today. I want to do the same for others.</p><p> <strong>Reflecting on the past two years, what are some of the biggest impacts that the pandemic has had on your job? </strong></p><p>First, recalibrating the way I spend my time in order to address the needs of my staff. We’ve had to find a new balance to their own responses to trauma and new energy levels when they are taxed to the point of exhaustion trying to meet the needs of students in this new post-COVID paradigm. The second biggest impact is leading my school family in the reestablishment of our school culture. So many of our kids came back impacted by anxiety, fear and personal trauma, or they have returned with an exuberance and zeal for being back at school. There really is no middle ground and, in reality, only my seniors were truly a part of the school culture that existed prior to the pandemic. It is as if we are having to begin at “ground zero” once again. I am perpetually reminding everyone that we cannot take for granted that all of our staff and students fully remember, understand or embrace all of the traditions, expectations and experiences that make us who we are as a school.</p><p> <strong>There have been many articles circulating about principal burnout. Have you experienced this and if so, how have you dealt with it? </strong></p><p>While burnout has not been something I’ve experienced, I will say yes, I have experienced some exhausting times of stress and have had to take some specific actions to make sure that burnout does not become a potential on my horizon. I make it a point daily to take a break and find my point of joy. When I was an elementary school principal, that was visiting a kindergarten class full of kids hanging on my pant leg and wanting to hang all over me as I read a story to them. That was such a gratifying and fulfilling experience. In my high school, it may be shooting a few hoops at PE with some of my kids, going to the band room and having an impromptu performance on the piano during a practice piece or joining a science lab group as one of the students. My kids keep me level.<strong></strong></p><p> <strong>What do principals need in order to feel supported?</strong></p><p>From parents, principals need patience and grace. We care about their kids, too! But when we are juggling so many things at once, some days it is like drinking water from a firehose. I tell my parents, your issue or concern is not lost or ignored, we just may need time to be able to address it appropriately. From peers, we need one another’s empathy on those challenging days. Brilliance and expertise on days when we need to tap the skill set of others so that we can learn. Being the leader at the top can be a solitary place at times. From the district, we need flexibility in mandates and deadlines. Every day is different as we strive to uplift our staff and students and as we try to address the demands and pressures to provide a “return to normalcy” while also entertaining the changes of a whole new education paradigm. From students, we need their commitment to&#58; experience school—get involved in activities, clubs, sports and career tech pathways; Explore—new learning, stretch yourself, grow; and Exhibit—good character, acceptance of others, making good choices and being a member of our school family.</p><p> <strong>What advice do you have for aspiring principals?</strong></p><p>I feel strongly that as school site administrators, we have the potential to have the greatest impact on shaping the next generation. I recommend my own version of the ‘three R’s’&#58; relationships, reflection and renewal. It is important that we take the time to first build relationships with fellow site administrators and to provide mutual support and inspiration. Second, it is important to end each and every day with a moment of reflection. What would you do differently? Give yourself some kudos and reflect on something you did well or on how you made an impact, and let that be the last thing you think about when you go home for the evening. Make certain that it is not the challenges, but the successes that you bring home with you. Finally, take time for renewal. Refill your emotional bucket with some self-care. Refill your professional bucket by learning something new. And then include time for physical renewal with exercise, meditation, or something else that recharges your battery.</p><p> <strong>What is the best part about being a principal? What experience will stay with you long after you’ve retired?</strong></p><p>The best part about being a principal is the relationships that we build as we seek to guide and develop better talents for the futures of students and staff. I have a folder that I call my “blue folder”. Here I save every card, every story, every email—the smiles, the memories and the treasured moments where I was able to make a difference. While I may not be rich in dollars, I am one of the wealthiest people you will ever meet when it comes to memories and connections. I am blessed daily to cross paths with people who, over my years as a principal, stop to share a smile, a hug, a thank you or a treasured memory. That is pure gold.</p>Four principals reflect on their experiences and share how we can support them during National Principals Month—and throughout the year. GP0|#3fabc3e0-eead-49a5-9e92-99d8217d8607;L0|#03fabc3e0-eead-49a5-9e92-99d8217d8607|principals;GTSet|#e1be52fb-ad26-4379-9818-fd44f616dcf2;GP0|#b9334c26-a923-4388-bc0a-e17897e654f7;L0|#0b9334c26-a923-4388-bc0a-e17897e654f7|schools;GP0|#0cb01eba-2e7f-46c5-93ac-fd5e107a7d36;L0|#00cb01eba-2e7f-46c5-93ac-fd5e107a7d36|districts;GP0|#9bd3b07b-0109-42ab-81a9-dbffde0c42be;L0|#09bd3b07b-0109-42ab-81a9-dbffde0c42be|education leadership;GP0|#cad33471-a186-455a-836f-0d0657808f00;L0|#0cad33471-a186-455a-836f-0d0657808f00|researchGP0|#330c9173-9d0f-423a-b58d-f88b8fb02708;L0|#0330c9173-9d0f-423a-b58d-f88b8fb02708|School Leadership;GTSet|#a1e8653d-64cb-48e0-8015-b5826f8c5b61Jenna Doleh91<img alt="" src="/News-and-Media/Blog/PublishingImages/National-Principals-Month-lg-feature3.jpg" style="BORDER&#58;0px solid;" />2022-10-26T04:00:00ZFour principals reflect on their experiences and share how we can support them during National Principals Month—and throughout the year.10/26/2022 6:23:06 PMThe Wallace Foundation / News and Media / Wallace Blog / Focusing on Principal Wellness: 6 Questions for School Leaders Four principals reflect on their experiences and share how 2075https://www.wallacefoundation.org/News-and-Media/Blog/Pages/Forms/AllItems.aspxhtmlFalseaspx
Exploring History and Culture with Arts Organizations of Color10216<p>​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​Arts ​organizations founded by, with and for communities of color are relatively underrepresented in research, with limited&#160;information available about their founding histories and how these histories might shape an organization’s purpose, culture and work.&#160;That’s why, when we launched <a href="/News-and-Media/Blog/pages/arts-open-call-yields-250-submissions-from-organizations-of-color.aspx">o​ur latest arts initiative</a>&#160;beginning with&#160;18 organizations rooted in communities of color, we commissioned the <a href="https&#58;//www.ssrc.org/programs/arts-research-with-communities-of-color-program-arcc/" target="_blank">Social Science Research Council </a>(SSRC) to create a fellowship that could not only ​help document the organizations’ history and culture, but could also build research capacity in the field through the support of early career scholars​.</p><p>SSRC has now selected a group of research fellows, who will receive funding to conduct 12-month qualitative ethnographic studies in collaboration with the organizations in the initiative. The fellowship program seeks to support early career researchers who are deeply engaged with the arts organizations of color. The group will participate in conversations with one another and with the broader network of researchers and practitioners in the Wallace initiative. </p><p>Each research fellow will be paired with a specific organization to help explore its unique history, culture and context. The goal is to produce useful information for the organization itself and for other arts organizations of color. Collectively, through cross-cutting analyses, the fellows’ research could also contribute novel insights to the broader body of research and public policy. </p><p> <strong>Meet the first group of fellows&#58;</strong><br> </p><p style="text-align&#58;left;"> <strong> <img src="/News-and-Media/Blog/PublishingImages/Pages/exploring-history-and-culture-with-arts-organizations-of-color/Monica-Barra2.jpg" alt="Monica-Barra2.jpg" class="wf-Image-Left" style="margin&#58;5px;width&#58;165px;height&#58;220px;" />Monica Patrice Barra</strong> (she/her/hers) is a cultural anthropologist, ceramicist, and assistant professor at the University of South Carolina. Broadly, her research examines the relationship between race, inequality, and geography in the United States. She has explored these topics over the past decade in collaboration with visual and performing artists, policymakers, scientists, community based organizations, and fishermen. Her experience and research has been supported by a variety of institutions across the arts, sciences, and humanities, including&#58; The Princeton University Art Museum, the National Academies of Sciences, the Wenner-Gren Foundation, and the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities. Her writings on place-based arts, environmental change, and race have appeared in edited volumes and journals in the fields of anthropology, geography, and interdisciplinary humanities. Her first book, Good Sediment&#58; Race, Science, and the Politics of Restoration, is an ethnographic study of wetland loss, environmental restoration, and Black placemaking practices in south Louisiana. She is currently at work on a second ethnographic project on heirs’ property and Black land loss in the US South.</p><p> <em>Monica will be partnering with the <a href="https&#58;//www.ganttcenter.org/" target="_blank">Gantt Center for African American Arts + Culture</a>.<br><br></em></p><p> <strong><img src="/News-and-Media/Blog/PublishingImages/Pages/exploring-history-and-culture-with-arts-organizations-of-color/Ying-Diao.jpeg" alt="Ying-Diao.jpeg" class="wf-Image-Right" style="margin&#58;5px;width&#58;159px;height&#58;253px;" />Ying Diao</strong> is an ethnomusicologist and cultural anthropologist with research expertise in relationships between cultural production, ethnicity, and politics, and in the anthropology of religion, voice, and mediation. Her work has focused on the musical dynamics of cross-border ethnoreligious development and resilience among upland communities in southwest China and mainland Southeast Asia. Supported by the SEM Deborah Wong Research &amp; Publication Award and AAS Publication Support Grant, her book project, Muted, Mediated, and Mobilized&#58; Faith by Aurality on the China-Myanmar Border, examines how transnational sound production, circulation, and consumption become integral to the Lisu perception and striving after Christian faith amidst constraints and uncertainties. She earned her Ph.D. in ethnomusicology from the University of Maryland, College Park (2016). She was a Research Fellow at the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity, Germany, from 2017-2019, and a lecturer at the University of Minnesota in Spring 2022.</p><p> <em>Ying will be partnering with <a href="https&#58;//www.ragamaladance.org/" target="_blank">Ragamala Dance Company</a>.<br><br></em></p><p> <strong><img src="/News-and-Media/Blog/PublishingImages/Pages/exploring-history-and-culture-with-arts-organizations-of-color/Timnet-Gedar.jpeg" alt="Timnet-Gedar.jpeg" class="wf-Image-Left" style="margin&#58;5px;width&#58;159px;height&#58;212px;" />Timnet Gedar</strong> is a historian with commitments to community engaged research and social justice. She holds an MSc in Social Development Practice, and graduate certificates in African Studies and Museum Studies. Her work includes research, teaching, and practice in intellectual history, political and social movements, Black print cultures, museums, education, and community engagement. She is a daughter of Eritrea and a proud Chicagoan.</p><p> <em>Timnet will be partnering with </em> <a href="https&#58;//chicagosinfonietta.org/" target="_blank"> <em>Chicago Sinfonietta</em></a>.​<br><br></p><p> <strong><strong style="color&#58;#555555;font-size&#58;14px;"><img src="/News-and-Media/Blog/PublishingImages/Pages/exploring-history-and-culture-with-arts-organizations-of-color/Nazanin-Ghaffari.jpg" alt="Nazanin-Ghaffari.jpg" class="wf-Image-Right" style="margin&#58;5px;width&#58;159px;" /></strong>Nazanin Ghaffari</strong> holds a Ph.D. in urban planning and public policy from the University of Texas&#160;at Arlington. She is interested in navigating disciplinary terrain in urban planning, public administration, feminist geography, and social anthropology to highlight the racialized, classed, gendered, and sexualized blind spots and biases found within conceptualizations of public spaces. Her research concerns inclusionary and/or exclusionary strategies incorporated by signature public spaces governance regimes through design, programming, policing, and management processes. She also investigates how design and planning empower historically marginalized communities through artistic interventions and bottom-up innovations to advance social, racial, and climate justice. Trained as an architect, urban designer, and urban planner, Nazanin has over a decade of professional experience with the United Nations Development Programme, UN-Habitat Mitigation Office, Asia-Pacific Slum Upgrading Working Group, Tehran Municipality Research Center, private design firms, grassroots and community organizations in the Middle East and North Texas.</p><p><em>Ghaffari will be partnering with <a href="https&#58;//www.rebuild-foundation.org/" target="_blank">Rebuild​</a></em>.</p>​ <p> <b>​</b></p><p> <strong><img src="/News-and-Media/Blog/PublishingImages/Pages/exploring-history-and-culture-with-arts-organizations-of-color/Davinia-Gregory-Kameka.JPG" alt="Davinia-Gregory-Kameka.JPG" class="wf-Image-Left" style="margin&#58;5px;width&#58;164px;height&#58;179px;" />Davinia ​Gregory-</strong><strong>Kameka</strong>’s most recent research focuses on sociology of the role of arts organizations and their cultural policy landscape in sustaining or disrupting racial capitalism (Robinson, 1983). Her doctoral work (2015-20) was the first piece of research to fully document the closure, aftermath and legacy creation of a Black-led arts organization; the first empirical analysis of what happens at this point of stress. Such closures often happen quickly and are complex. They are sometimes documented after the fact using document analysis and archival material. However, this empirical, data-rich analysis of what happens in real time when an organization implodes is important because it bridges the gap between what policy documents say about the role and function of what policy calls “cultural diversity in the arts” and what happens (and is needed) on the ground. Among other things, her work asks, what is the importance of Black space in the arts in multiple locations across the Black Atlantic, and how is that space created, contested and supported in the pandemic age?</p><p> <em>Davinia will be partnering with <a href="https&#58;//www.blackstarfest.org/" target="_blank">BlackStar</a>.<br><br></em></p><p> <strong><img src="/News-and-Media/Blog/PublishingImages/Pages/exploring-history-and-culture-with-arts-organizations-of-color/Cameron-Herman.jpg" alt="Cameron-Herman.jpg" class="wf-Image-Right" style="margin&#58;5px;width&#58;165px;height&#58;228px;" />Dr. Cameron Herman</strong> is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology and an affiliate faculty member in Africana Studies at Buffalo State College. His teaching and research broadly focuses on understanding the ways marginalized groups experience and navigate social inequalities in urban environments. Cameron has published solo and collaborative journal articles, chapters in edited volumes and online publications on a range of topics including Black artists’ response to gentrification, housing activism and neoliberal governance, Black masculinity in hip hop. In the wake of COVID-19’s onset, Cameron’s research agenda has expanded through collaborations with community partners and equity-minded scholars in the UB Food Systems and Healthy Communities lab to support community-based responses to inequitable food systems in Buffalo, NY. In his free time, Cameron enjoys spending time with his wife and daughter, exploring neighborhoods on his bicycle and photographing everyday life.</p><p> <em>Cameron will be partnering with <a href="https&#58;//www.1hood.org/" target="_blank">1Hood Media</a>.<br><br></em></p><p> <strong><img src="/News-and-Media/Blog/PublishingImages/Pages/exploring-history-and-culture-with-arts-organizations-of-color/Raquel-Jimenez.jpg" alt="Raquel-Jimenez.jpg" class="wf-Image-Left" style="margin&#58;5px;width&#58;164px;height&#58;246px;" />Raquel Jimenez</strong>’s research explores socially-engaged creative practices and the distinct place-based logics that guide community arts organizations. This interest is reflected in her dissertation, “Taking Up Space&#58; Youth Culture and Creative Resistance in a Gentrifying City,” an ethnographic study that examines how youth engage with public artmaking strategies to resist gentrification, while investigating how community arts education structures this process. Raquel teaches courses on art and culture at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and designs participatory community arts programs at the intersection of art, education, and cultural organizing. Her work has been supported by the Ford Foundation and the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Apart from research and teaching, Raquel is a member of the Sirens Crew, an all-womxn public art collective working to feminize public space through a variety of visual intervention strategies.​</p><p> <em>Raquel will be partnering with <a href="https&#58;//pregonesprtt.org/" target="_blank">Pregones PRTT</a>.<br></em><br> </p><p> <strong><img src="/News-and-Media/Blog/PublishingImages/Pages/exploring-history-and-culture-with-arts-organizations-of-color/Asif-Majid.jpg" alt="Asif-Majid.jpg" class="wf-Image-Right" style="margin&#58;5px;width&#58;249px;height&#58;166px;" />Asif Majid</strong> is a scholar-artist-educator working at the intersection of racialized sociopolitical identities, multimedia, marginality, and new performance, particularly through devising community-based participatory theatre, making improvisational music, and addressing the nexus of Islam and performance. He has published in a range of academic and popular media outlets, and his performance credits include work with the Kennedy Center in the US and the Royal Exchange Theatre in the UK, among others. Asif was a Mellon/ACLS Public Fellow with the San Francisco Arts Commission and a Lab Fellow with The Laboratory for Global Performance and Performance. He earned his PhD in Anthropology, Media, and Performance from The University of Manchester. Currently, Asif is Assistant Professor of Theatre and Human Rights at the University of Connecticut, where he is at work on a book project titled Making Muslimness&#58; Race, Religion, and Performance in Contemporary Britain. Asif can be found online at <a href="http&#58;//www.asifmajid.com/" target="_blank">www.asifmajid.com</a>.</p><p> <em>Asif will be partnering with the <a href="https&#58;//arabamericanmuseum.org/" target="_blank">Arab American National Museum</a>.<br><br></em><u></u></p><p> <strong><img src="/News-and-Media/Blog/PublishingImages/Pages/exploring-history-and-culture-with-arts-organizations-of-color/Jason-J-Price.jpg" alt="Jason-J-Price.jpg" class="wf-Image-Left" style="margin&#58;5px;width&#58;165px;height&#58;165px;" />Jason J. Price</strong> is an Arts Research with Communities of Color (ARCC) Fellow, working in collaboration with his matched organization to explore how social science research can contribute to a thriving and more equitable arts field. He earned a PhD in sociocultural anthropology from UC Berkeley and an Advanced Certificate in Culture &amp; Media from NYU. His dissertation research, funded by the Fulbright Program, focused on the cultivation of endurance in a Pentecostal ministry in Malawi. His documentary short, The Professor, a portrait of former Interim President of Liberia, David Kpormakpor, has screened at festivals worldwide. From 2018-2020, he was Postdoctoral Researcher at IUPUI’s Arts &amp; Humanities Institute, where he worked with equity-driven arts organizations to improve their reach and efficacy.</p><p> <em>Jason will be partnering with <a href="https&#58;//pillsburyhouseandtheatre.org/" target="_blank">Pillsbury House + Theater</a>.<br></em><br> </p><p> <strong><img src="/News-and-Media/Blog/PublishingImages/Pages/exploring-history-and-culture-with-arts-organizations-of-color/Jason-C-White.jpg" alt="Jason-C-White.jpg" class="wf-Image-Right" style="margin&#58;5px;width&#58;214px;height&#58;171px;" />Dr. Jason C. White</strong> is an Assistant Professor of Arts Administration in the Department of Art at Xavier University, where he prepares students for diverse careers in arts administration. An accomplished researcher, educator, author and theorist, White has published in Artivate&#58; A Journal of Entrepreneurship in the Arts, Journal of Arts Management, Law and Society, Innovative Higher Education, and Arts Education Policy Review. White is also the author of Innovation in the Arts&#58; Concepts, Theories and Practices, a recent Routledge publication. White is one of the co-creators of the AAAE Undergraduate Standards for Arts Administration Education. Prior to receiving his PhD in Arts Administration, Education and Policy from The Ohio State University, White earned a BFA from California Institute of the Arts and attended The University of Akron; obtaining a Masters degree in Arts Administration and a Masters degree in Educational Assessment. Learn more about Dr. White at <a href="http&#58;//www.innovationinthearts.com/" target="_blank">www.innovationinthearts.com</a>.</p><p> <em>Jason will be partnering with <a href="https&#58;//www.u-ca.org/" target="_blank">The Union for Contemporary Art</a>.<br></em><a href="https&#58;//www.u-ca.org/"></a>​<br><br></p><p> <strong><img src="/News-and-Media/Blog/PublishingImages/Pages/exploring-history-and-culture-with-arts-organizations-of-color/DeRon-Williams.jpeg" alt="DeRon-Williams.jpeg" class="wf-Image-Left" style="margin&#58;5px;width&#58;164px;height&#58;291px;" />DeRon S. Williams</strong> is an Assistant Professor of Theatre in the Department of Fine and Performing Arts at Loyola University Chicago and a freelance director and dramaturg. He has published in The Journal of American Drama and Theatre, Continuum&#58; The Journal of African Diaspora Drama. His directing credits include Tarell Alvin McCraney’s The Brothers Size, Regina Taylor’s Crowns, Bruce Norris’s Clybourne Park, and Africa to America&#58; A Celebration of Who We Are, an interdisciplinary performance written by Wendy R. Coleman. DeRon is also co-editor of the forthcoming edited volume titled Contemporary Black Theatre &amp; Performance&#58; Acts of Rebellion, Activism, and Solidarity, as a part of the Methuen Drama Agitations&#58; Politics, Text, Performance series.</p><p> <em>DeRon will be partnering with <a href="https&#58;//philadanco.org/" target="_blank">PHILADANCO!</a></em><a href="https&#58;//philadanco.org/"></a></p> ​<br>​<br><br>Eleven fellows tapped by Social Science Research Council will work with organizations in Wallace’s art initiativeGP0|#459b8438-9b87-47d0-814e-02452652da81;L0|#0459b8438-9b87-47d0-814e-02452652da81|arts;GTSet|#e1be52fb-ad26-4379-9818-fd44f616dcf2;GP0|#14e1aeaf-21f5-4cd8-b930-962b63c1979c;L0|#014e1aeaf-21f5-4cd8-b930-962b63c1979c|arts organizations of color;GP0|#566850e0-19f2-4c8d-9031-5d5f8718367b;L0|#0566850e0-19f2-4c8d-9031-5d5f8718367b|grantees;GP0|#cad33471-a186-455a-836f-0d0657808f00;L0|#0cad33471-a186-455a-836f-0d0657808f00|research;GP0|#13c6033c-e108-4f92-ac19-ca85041545d6;L0|#013c6033c-e108-4f92-ac19-ca85041545d6|arts researchGP0|#a2eb43fb-abab-4f1c-ae41-72fd1022ddb0;L0|#0a2eb43fb-abab-4f1c-ae41-72fd1022ddb0|The Arts;GTSet|#a1e8653d-64cb-48e0-8015-b5826f8c5b61Wallace editorial team79<img alt="" src="/News-and-Media/Blog/PublishingImages/SSRC-fellows-lg-features.jpg" style="BORDER&#58;0px solid;" />2022-10-11T04:00:00ZEleven fellows tapped by Social Science Research Council will work with organizations in Wallace’s art initiative11/3/2022 8:07:35 PMThe Wallace Foundation / News and Media / Wallace Blog / Exploring History and Culture with Arts Organizations of Color Eleven fellows tapped by Social Science Research Council 1138https://www.wallacefoundation.org/News-and-Media/Blog/Pages/Forms/AllItems.aspxhtmlFalseaspx
Lessons from Six Communities Building Students’ SEL Skills2249​<p>​​​​​What can be learned when six communities bring together schools and out-of-school time (OST) partners to support students’ social and emotional learning (SEL)? A lot, apparently.<br></p><p><a href="/knowledge-center/pages/strengthening-students-social-and-emotional-skills-vol2-pt1.aspx">A new report from RAND</a> presents lessons culled from the six school districts that participated in Wallace’s social and emotional learning initiative. The multiyear effort, which concluded in 2021, explored whether and how children can benefit from partnerships between schools and out-of-school-time (OST) programs that were focused on building social and emotional skills.</p><p>The report synthesizes nine cross-cutting factors that facilitated these efforts, such as committed school and OST program leaders, building adults’ social and emotional skills, and establishing trusting relationships.</p><p>Along with the overarching report, RAND produced&#160;<a href="/knowledge-center/pages/district-partner-problem-solving-in-social-emotional-learning-efforts-series-vol2.aspx">six case studies</a>, each focused on one of the districts that participated in the initiative. Highlights from the case studies include&#58;</p><p></p><div class="wf-Element-BlueBullet">In&#160;<a href="/knowledge-center/pages/expanding-social-and-emotional-learning-boston-vol2-pt2.aspx?_ga=2.236588289.1269491334.1664803907-363535270.1663784266">Boston</a>, the partnership worked to expand students’ access to enrichment and linked the enrichment activities to the school-day curriculum through a shared focus on SEL.<br> </div><p></p><p></p><div class="wf-Element-BlueBullet">The&#160;<a href="/knowledge-center/pages/building-an-effective-social-and-emotional-learning-committe-dallas-vol2-pt3.aspx">Dallas</a> team focused on sustainable SEL practices and formed a steering committee to drive the work forward.</div><p></p><p></p><div class="wf-Element-BlueBullet">Through joint planning, collaboration and professional development, the partnership in&#160;<a href="/knowledge-center/pages/jointly-prioritizing-time-for-social-and-emotional-learning-in-denver-vol2-pt4.aspx?_ga=2.236588289.1269491334.1664803907-363535270.1663784266">Denver</a> prioritized SEL across in school and after school by making it a part of the daily routine.</div><p></p><p></p><div class="wf-Element-BlueBullet">In&#160;<a href="/knowledge-center/pages/engaging-teachers-staff-parents-social-and-emotional-learning-palm-beach-county-vol2-pt5.aspx">Palm Beach County, Fla.</a>, the team provided SEL training to non instructional school staff and families to help students have positive interactions not only in the classroom but in the cafeteria, on the bus and at home.</div><p></p><p></p><div class="wf-Element-BlueBullet">In&#160;<a href="/knowledge-center/pages/learning-to-focus-on-adult-sel-first-tulsa-vol2-pt7.aspx?_ga=2.236588289.1269491334.1664803907-363535270.1663784266">Tulsa</a>, the team recognized the need to help the adults working with students to&#160;develop their own social-emotional skills so they could support social and emotional learning for their students and model SEL competencies.</div><p></p><p></p><div class="wf-Element-BlueBullet">And&#160;<a href="/knowledge-center/pages/prioritizing-racial-equity-within-social-and-emotional-learning-tacoma-vol2-pt6.aspx?_ga=2.236588289.1269491334.1664803907-363535270.1663784266">Tacoma</a> focused on integrating racial equity and restorative practices into its SEL approach.</div><p></p><p>You can read more about the Partnerships for Social and Emotional Learning Initiative&#160;<a href="/knowledge-center/pages/early-lessons-from-schools-and-out-of-school-time-programs-implementing-social-and-emotional-learning.aspx">here</a>. And listen to the stories of several practitioners from the initiative on our&#160;<a href="/knowledge-center/pages/podcast-the-partnerships-for-social-and-emotional-learning.aspx">Partnerships for Social and Emotional Learning Podcast</a>.</p>Studies explore how schools and community partners collaborated to build children’s social-emotional skills GP0|#b30ec468-8df4-44a4-8b93-5bb0225193fc;L0|#0b30ec468-8df4-44a4-8b93-5bb0225193fc|SEL;GTSet|#e1be52fb-ad26-4379-9818-fd44f616dcf2;GP0|#1e20fb94-7fab-472d-a0c9-fcb059d9ea3d;L0|#01e20fb94-7fab-472d-a0c9-fcb059d9ea3d|out-of-school-time;GP0|#9926137a-0b03-4ba6-99ab-2b27da91b543;L0|#09926137a-0b03-4ba6-99ab-2b27da91b543|partnerships;GP0|#cad33471-a186-455a-836f-0d0657808f00;L0|#0cad33471-a186-455a-836f-0d0657808f00|research;GP0|#194bb2e4-4fb6-4e11-93f6-447b42d68351;L0|#0194bb2e4-4fb6-4e11-93f6-447b42d68351|case studiesGP0|#890cbc1f-f78a-45e7-9bf2-a5986c564667;L0|#0890cbc1f-f78a-45e7-9bf2-a5986c564667|Social and Emotional Learning;GTSet|#a1e8653d-64cb-48e0-8015-b5826f8c5b61Andrea Ruggirello114<img alt="" src="/News-and-Media/Blog/PublishingImages/blog-strengthening-students-social-and-emotional-skills-vol2-pt1-lg-feature.jpg" style="BORDER&#58;0px solid;" />2022-10-05T04:00:00ZStudies explore how schools and community partners collaborated to build children’s social-emotional skills10/5/2022 5:05:52 PMThe Wallace Foundation / News and Media / Wallace Blog / Lessons from Six Communities Building Students’ SEL Skills Studies explore how schools and community partners collaborated 591https://www.wallacefoundation.org/News-and-Media/Blog/Pages/Forms/AllItems.aspxhtmlFalseaspx
University's Revamped Principal Training Yields Changes for District, Too45694<p>W​​​​​​hen Henrico County Public Schools and Virginia State University began their partnership six years ago, their goal was to improve the university’s principal preparation program. Here’s what wasn’t on the horizon&#58; redesigning the district’s leadership professional development.&#160;</p><p>But what began as a Wallace-sponsored initiative to ensure that university training of future principals reflected research-based practices, ended up sparking a big rethink of leader prep within Henrico itself. The result? Changes to and expansion of professional development across the spectrum from teacher-leaders all the way up to principal supervisors. </p><p>“This was an opportunity for us to develop a new partnership, to strengthen our principal pipeline and to be involved in the work of the principal preparation program,” says Tracie Weston, director of professional development at Henrico County Public Schools, which serves about 50,000 students in suburban Richmond. </p><p>The&#160; “opportunity” in question was the University Principal Preparation Initiative (UPPI), in which seven universities in seven states each worked with a handful of local school districts and others to reshape their school-leader training programming to incorporate what research has found about everything from curriculum and clinical experiences to candidate admissions. Virginia State was one of those universities, and Henrico County was one of its partner districts, working, like all the other initiative districts, to ensure that the university programs responded to the needs and circumstances of the locales that hired program graduates. </p><p>An unexpected outcome, however, was that working to boost the university programming inspired the district to boost its own development efforts, according to a <a href="/knowledge-center/pages/district-partnerships-with-university-principal-preparation-programs.aspx">study</a> by the RAND Corp. The initiative “raised the visibility of school leadership in the district and created a window of opportunity where district leadership supported PD,”&#160; RAND reported, using the initials for “professional development.” A number of changes resulted. For example, some of the topics addressed in the refashioned district PD, including leadership dispositions and equity, reflected priorities that Virginia State and its partner districts had discussed in redesigning the university program, according to RAND’s <a href="/knowledge-center/Documents/redesigning-university-principal-preparation-programs-full-report.pdf">in-depth examination</a> of the initiative. And Henrico’s PD for sitting principals began pairings of district leaders with sitting principals to emphasize policy and practice–an approach used in the university program. </p><p>Henrico County works successfully with a number of pre-service preparation programs, Weston says. As a district with a highly diverse student population, the school system welcomed collaborating as well with Virginia State, a historically Black university with a strong commitment to educational equity. “Much of our work in the college of education has been to bring about greater equity in the face of teacher education, counselor education and K-12 administration,” said Willis Walter, the university’s dean of education. “We have a fairly simple conceptual framework that is deeply rooted in culturally responsive pedagogy, and I think that is, for the most part, what attracted Henrico to some of the concepts we were teaching. We come at education from the standpoint of everyone has strengths.”</p><p>When it started working with the university, the district had several different programs that looked at pieces of leadership, but not leadership as a whole. </p><p>“To strengthen the things Henrico was already doing well, we wanted to make sure they had the right people at the table and the most vetted and best practices that were out there. And the best way of doing that was us working together,” Walter said. </p><p>The school system and university representatives bonded quickly,&#160; according to Walter. “I think that's because there was a common passion and a common focus,” ​he said. “We had some real knock-down, dragged-out conversations, but because everyone in the room trusted and appreciated the point of view that the other was coming from, it was never taken to an extreme.”</p><p>At the start of the initiative, Henrico had a small team responsible for providing professional learning for school leaders. Because these team members had all been principals, they recognized the need for ongoing, job-embedded professional learning for all leaders, including teachers. Throughout the UPPI partnership, Weston recalls, there were conversations about additional areas that needed to be included in a principal preparation program to ensure that leaders understood the responsibilities of the position, and that they were prepared for those responsibilities. These conversations led to taking a closer look at what professional learning the partner districts themselves were providing for school leaders. </p><p>The “moment of magic” as Weston calls it–the moment that led to the district wanting to revamp its entire professional development process–occurred when Henrico visited Gwinnett County, Ga., whose school district, known for its leader-development endeavors, worked with Virginia State in the UPPI.&#160; </p><p>Within the first six months of seeing the work in Gwinnett (a participant in an earlier Wallace venture), Henrico had developed its Aspiring Leader Academy, a district program designed to help prepare those aspiring to leadership jobs for their future administrative positions. Henrico’s goal was to create a program that was “meaningful, relevant&#160;and sustainable,” according to Weston. The interest in that academy was so high that Henrico expanded and introduced some new features to it.&#160; </p><p>“In year two, not only were we looking to identify our next school leaders, but we also wanted to provide professional learning for teachers who wanted to lead from the classroom–those who wanted to stay but grow,” said Weston. So, Henrico introduced a track for&#160;teacher-leaders. Both aspiring principal and teacher-leader tracks were aligned with national model standards for school leadership, the <a href="/knowledge-center/pages/professional-standards-for-educational-leaders-2015.aspx">Professional Standards for Educational Leaders</a>, and, while in training, the two groups came together for the morning sessions, which were led by the school system’s top administrative leaders–superintendents and directors–so that the candidates had the opportunity to “learn through the broader lens vision of how we work together to maximize student achievement.”</p><p>The afternoon sessions were tailored to the two different tracks, with the aspiring principals in one room and aspiring teacher-leaders in another.</p><p>District leaders also identified a gap in Henrico’s professional learning effort&#58; development for assistant principals. They created a third track based on the teacher-leader effort, called the Assistant Principal Learning Series. In this track, candidates participate in “action research,” where assistant principals look at a problem of practice at their school. In their second year of the program, they can tap into more personalized options–at present more than 17 to choose from.</p><p>“So in the year we kicked off the AP learning series, every leader in Henrico County was getting a minimum of one day of professional learning targeted to an area of leadership where they felt they needed growth,” Weston said.<strong> </strong></p><p>After adding APs, Henrico expanded the program yet again to include principal supervisors. That means that today the district has professional learning opportunities for aspiring leaders to assistant principals and principals all the way up to supervisors.</p><p>There may be more to come. “We're so excited about the work that we were exposed to and the connections we made, that we want to create a statewide cohort of principal supervisors so that principal supervisors across the state are receiving quality, relevant, practical professional learning for their positions,” Weston said.</p><p>Weston and Walter credit the partnership between the university and district for improving principal development on both sides. </p><p>“We were looking at best practice from a theory standpoint, and they were looking at best practice from an application standpoint,” Walter said. “I think the merging of those two benefited both of us. We were able to bring more relevant examples to our candidates that were about to graduate as well as to make sure that our faculty were on the right page when it came to the conversations they were having with prospective administrators in many of our surrounding communities.”</p><p>Although the grant from the University Principal Preparation Initiative has ended, Henrico and VSU have continued their strong partnership.</p><p>“It's an ongoing partnership where we lift one another, we share resources, we share experiences,” Weston said. “We're helping Virginia State see what the boots-on-the-ground challenges are, and how that can be reflected in the coursework that the students are being exposed to so that when they graduate, they are ready for the real-life challenges of K-12.”</p><p>Both Weston and Walter have advice for other districts and universities that wish to take on similar partnerships to revamp the way they develop and support school leaders. </p><p>“We always focused on the K-12 student, not on the personality, not on the administration,” Walter said. “It was all about what is best for the K-12 students in that community.”</p><p>Weston emphasized the importance of being willing&#160; to lean on partners for support. “Have conversations, reach out, make connections,” she said. “Because we learn from one another.”&#160;<br></p>How one school district looked to its university partners to help redesign its professional development for school leaders GP0|#3fabc3e0-eead-49a5-9e92-99d8217d8607;L0|#03fabc3e0-eead-49a5-9e92-99d8217d8607|principals;GTSet|#e1be52fb-ad26-4379-9818-fd44f616dcf2;GP0|#b9334c26-a923-4388-bc0a-e17897e654f7;L0|#0b9334c26-a923-4388-bc0a-e17897e654f7|schools;GP0|#78fba0d8-bc10-4d3c-be46-3e19b4af2521;L0|#078fba0d8-bc10-4d3c-be46-3e19b4af2521|school leaders;GP0|#ef957b83-4dcb-4f16-bf0a-af36a2a203fa;L0|#0ef957b83-4dcb-4f16-bf0a-af36a2a203fa|hiring;GP0|#585ab5b2-b18b-4f5a-a5e0-0c2e83ebbf6a;L0|#0585ab5b2-b18b-4f5a-a5e0-0c2e83ebbf6a|leadership development;GP0|#3c236eec-afa6-4172-9b42-36a57befc9fe;L0|#03c236eec-afa6-4172-9b42-36a57befc9fe|principal pipeline;GP0|#6caf5436-4cc1-4e8a-9394-43582c698883;L0|#06caf5436-4cc1-4e8a-9394-43582c698883|universitiesGP0|#330c9173-9d0f-423a-b58d-f88b8fb02708;L0|#0330c9173-9d0f-423a-b58d-f88b8fb02708|School Leadership;GTSet|#a1e8653d-64cb-48e0-8015-b5826f8c5b61Jenna Doleh91<img alt="" src="/News-and-Media/Blog/PublishingImages/blog-redesigning-university-principal-preparation-programs-feature.jpg" style="BORDER&#58;0px solid;" />2022-09-14T04:00:00ZYour source for research and ideas to expand high quality learning and enrichment opportunities. Supporting: School Leadership, After School, Summer and Extended Learning Time, Arts Education and Building Audiences for the Arts.9/14/2022 2:10:49 PMThe Wallace Foundation / News and Media / Wallace Blog / University's Revamped Principal Training Yields Changes for District, Too How one school district looked to its university 1622https://www.wallacefoundation.org/News-and-Media/Blog/Pages/Forms/AllItems.aspxhtmlFalseaspx
How Can Music Organizations Be More Inclusive?384 ​ ​<p>​I​​​​​n a ​<a href="/knowledge-center/pages/a-place-to-be-heard-a-space-to-feel-held-black-perspectives.aspx">recent study </a>exploring 50 B​lack Americans’ perceptions of the arts, some participants at the beginning of their interview shared that they did not consider themselves creative. But as their conversation with the researchers continued, the participants discovered the many ways that creativity and art exist&#160;within their lives.<br></p><p>“That’s kind of the beauty of using different types of methods. With the quantitative research, you are able to look at the frequency of different experiences or different types of things people are thinking,” said Melody Buyukozer Dawkins, one of the researchers who authored the study. “But with qualitative research you’re able to bring out those stories and you can have that kind of one-to-one interaction with people.”</p><p>Buyukozer Dawkins was speaking on an episode of “CMA Talks,” a podcast hosted by Nichole L. Knight at Chamber Music America. </p><p>In the conversation, Buyukozer Dawkins highlights several insights that came out of the project’s free-flowing interviews with people whose perspectives have often been underrepresented in research and the arts. She also tackles how arts organizations might develop stronger relationships with their Black constituents and the importance of helping to lift up voices that have been historically sidelined. </p><p>Listen to the full episode on <a href="https&#58;//podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/cma-talks-season-3-episode-2-close-listening/id1373815844?i=1000570620285" target="_blank">Apple Podcasts</a> and read CMA’s article, “<a href="https&#58;//www.chambermusicamerica.org/close-listening" target="_blank">Close Listening</a>,” about the report from the spring issue of <em>Chamber Music America</em> Magazine. You can find the report <a href="/knowledge-center/pages/a-place-to-be-heard-a-space-to-feel-held-black-perspectives.aspx"> <em>A Place to Be Heard, A Space to Feel Held&#58; Perspectives on Creativity, Trustworthiness, Welcome, and Well-Being</em></a>&#160;​on Wallace’s website. </p><p><em>Top&#160;photo by&#160;Deb Fong</em><br><br></p>Popular podcast for chamber musicians explores equity, access and research in the artsGP0|#7af2c23a-4f3b-4d76-806b-f2c785aa4ab1;L0|#07af2c23a-4f3b-4d76-806b-f2c785aa4ab1|art;GTSet|#e1be52fb-ad26-4379-9818-fd44f616dcf2;GP0|#13c6033c-e108-4f92-ac19-ca85041545d6;L0|#013c6033c-e108-4f92-ac19-ca85041545d6|arts research;GP0|#7ee74777-f4ad-4204-a3cc-1a02bb45abab;L0|#07ee74777-f4ad-4204-a3cc-1a02bb45abab|arts audiences;GP0|#6d76b4c4-bff2-4a32-9edd-7f97c22d5061;L0|#06d76b4c4-bff2-4a32-9edd-7f97c22d5061|performing arts;GP0|#44800786-66e9-4e66-8f29-d9d79cc403ae;L0|#044800786-66e9-4e66-8f29-d9d79cc403ae|museumsGP0|#a2eb43fb-abab-4f1c-ae41-72fd1022ddb0;L0|#0a2eb43fb-abab-4f1c-ae41-72fd1022ddb0|The Arts;GTSet|#a1e8653d-64cb-48e0-8015-b5826f8c5b61Wallace editorial team79<img alt="" src="/News-and-Media/Blog/PublishingImages/Deb-Fong-deb_fong_photography.jpg" style="BORDER&#58;0px solid;" />2022-08-18T04:00:00ZPopular podcast for chamber musicians explores equity, access and research in the arts10/7/2022 2:24:25 PMThe Wallace Foundation / News and Media / Wallace Blog / How Can Music Organizations Be More Inclusive Popular podcast for chamber musicians explores equity, access and research in 1263https://www.wallacefoundation.org/News-and-Media/Blog/Pages/Forms/AllItems.aspxhtmlFalseaspx

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​